The 2nd
International Conference on Nail Disorders 2022

December 14-15, 2022

Dan Panorama Hotel, Tel Aviv

Welcome

Dear colleagues,

We are pleased to announce the 2nd International Conference on Nail Disorders in Israel.

The aims of the conference are many and varied, and the main goal is to open a window into a fascinating and challenging field of dermatology, while focusing on various nail diseases. Different skin diseases such as psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, Lichen planus, etc. often affect nails with or without the appearance of fungal infection.

Read more...

  • Conference President
    Prof. Avner Shemer
  • Conference Co-Chair
    Prof. C. Ralph Daniel

Invited Speakers

  • Dr. Regina Casz Schechtman

    Brazilian society of Dermatology, American Academy of Dermatology, International society of Dermatology

    Read more

  • Prof. Aviv Barzilai

    Department of Dermatology, Sheba Medical Center

    Read more

  • Prof. C. Ralph Daniel

    University of Mississippi Medical Center and, University of Alabama
    USA

    Read more

  • Prof. Roni P. Dodiuk-Gad

    Inflammatory and Autoimmune Skin Diseases Unit, Dermatology Department, Emek Medical Center, Israel & Dermatology Program

    Clinical Associate Professor, Bruce Rappaport Faculty of Medicine, Technion - Institute of Technology, Israel.

    Read more

  • Dr. Tomer Goldsmith

    Director of inpatient care, Division of Dermatology, Tel Aviv Medical center

    Read more

  • Prof. Shoshana Greenberger

    The Department of Dermatology, Sheba Medical Center Israel

    Read more

  • Prof. Boni Elewski

    University of Alabama
    USA

    Read more

  • Dr. Eran Galili

    Department of Dermatology, Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Israel

    Read more

  • Dr. Shamir Geller

    Division of Dermatology, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Israel

    Read more

  • Prof. Aditya K. Gupta

    Department of Medicine (Division of Dermatology), University of Toronto, Canada

    Read more

  • Prof. Eckart Haneke

    Department of Dermatology, Inselspital, University Bern, Switzerland

    Read more

  • Dr. Felix Pavlotsky

    Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Israel

    Read more

  • Dr. Lev Pavlovski

    Rabin Medical Center, Israel

    Read more

  • Dr.Vered Molho Pessach

    Department of Dermatology, Hadasah, Medical Center, Jerusalem, Israel

    Read more

  • Prof. Bianca Maria Piraccini

    Dermatological Unit Alma Mater Studiorum University of Bologna, Italy

    Read more

  • Prof. Eli Sprecher

    Division of Dermatology, Tel Aviv Medical center, Israel

    Read more

  • Dr. Michal Ramon

    Rambam medical center,Haifa,Israel

    Read more

  • Prof. Yuval Ramot

    Department of Dermatology, Hadassah Medical Center, Jerusalem, Israel

    Read more

  • Prof. Dimitris Rigopoulos

    National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Medical School, Sygros Hospital
    Greece

    Read more

  • Prof. Phoebe Rich

    Oregon Health and Science University, and Oregon Dermatology and Research

    Read more

  • Prof. Adam I. Rubin

    University of Pennsylvania
    USA

    Read more

Dr. Regina Casz Schechtman

Brazilian society of Dermatology, American Academy of Dermatology, International society of Dermatology

Bio:

General Secretary Brazilian Society of Dermatology-Rio de Janeiro Section (2021-2022). Assistant Professor in Dermatology and Mycology at Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Adjunt Professor in Dermatology at State University of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. 22 Peer-reviewed papers; 38 chapters of books; 1 book; 83 papers presented at conference and 118 invited talks at conference.

Title:

Lecture 1:
Non-dermatophytic Filamentous Fungal Onychomycosis: Reality or Misdiagnosis?

Abstract:

Abstract 1

Filamentous fungi in general constitute a large number of agents that appear in the environment as hyaline or pigmented hyphae, transmitted by inhalation or transcutaneous implantation of infective propagules and have low virulence potential.

In severely immunosuppressed hosts, some filamentous fungi can invade deep structures compromising organs or tissues and causing invasive fungal diseases. Non-dermatophytic filamentous fungi (FFND) are considered a heterogeneous group of fungi that are generally saprophytic, but are implicated in dermatological infectious processes. They mostly cause onychomycosis, but there are also reports of cases of involvement of other topographies, such as skin, scalp and hair. Scientific articles that estimate the prevalence of causal agents of onychomycosis consider that the frequency of involvement by FFND varies between 1% and 20%. Lately, FFND have been considered etiological agents of increasing importance in the context of onychomycosis, especially in countries with hot and humid climates. In Thailand and Jamaica, for example, it is estimated that 10% to 50% of superficial fungal infections are caused by Scytalidium spp.

 

Prof. Aviv Barzilai

Department of Dermatology, Sheba Medical Center

Bio:

Title:

Abstract:

Prof. C. Ralph Daniel

Clinical Professor of DermatologyUniversity of Mississippi Medical Center and, University of Alabama
USA

Bio:

Nail Disorders 2022 Conference Co-Chair

Undergraduate Education:

Vanderbilt University – 1970-1973
Medical school – University of Mississippi Medical Center – 1973-1977
Medical Internship – University of Mississippi Medical Center – 1977-1978
Residency in Dermatology – University of Alabama, Birmingham – 1978-1981

Leadership positions:

  1. President Council for Nail Disorders, Mississippi Dermatology Society, Jackson Academy of Medicine, St. Dominic’s Health Services Foundation
  2. Vice President European Nail Society
  3. Board of Directors – American Academy of Dermatology, NOAH, American Medical Athletic Association
  4. Published:
    1. 6 books on nails
    2. Over 120 papers

Title:

Abstract:

Prof. Roni P. Dodiuk-Gad

Inflammatory and Autoimmune Skin Diseases Unit, Dermatology Department, Emek Medical Center, Israel & Dermatology Program

Clinical Associate Professor, Bruce Rappaport Faculty of Medicine, Technion - Institute of Technology, Israel.

Bio:

A clinician, researcher, educator, and opinion leader in Dermatology on the topics of adverse cutaneous drug reactions and Darier disease. Dr. Dodiuk-Gad graduated from the Technion and conducted clinical and research fellowships in the University of Toronto. She is currently the head of the Inflammatory and Autoimmune Skin Diseases Unit, Dermatology Department, Emek Medical Center, Israel. She is also the head of Dermatology Program & Clinical Associate Professor in Bruce Rappaport Faculty of Medicine, Technion - Israel and an Assistant Professor - Status Only, Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, Canada. Dr. Dodiuk-Gad is engaged in major international professional and academic collaborations

Title:

Abstract:

Dr. Tomer Goldsmith

Director of nail clinic, Tel Aviv medical centerDirector of inpatient care, Division of Dermatology, Tel Aviv Medical center

Bio:

Tomer Goldsmith is a graduate of Ben Gurion university of the Negev (summa cum laude), and completed parts of his clinical years at the Albert Einstein medical school, New York. He has completed his residency in dermatology at the Tel Aviv medical center. He then received further training in nail medicine and surgery at CHU Brugmann, Brussels, under the guidance of professor Bertrand Richert.

Upon returning to Tel Aviv Tomer was appointed as head of inpatient service at the Tel Aviv medical center division of Dermatology, In addition to being the director of the nail clinic there, that serves as a referral center to patients with nail problems from all over Israel.

In addition to his clinical practice Dr Goldsmith has also been involved in basic science research in molecular dermatology, studying keratinization disorders and ectodermal dysplasia, as well as various clinical studies.

Title:

Lecture 1:
Melanonychia – seeing the full picture

Abstract:

Melanonychia is a common condition seen in the dermatology practice. The lecture will deal with the proper diagnostic approach to melanonychia, with special emphasis on when and how should it be surgically excised. Various diagnostic and surgical approaches will be discussed, and common pitfalls explained.

Prof. Shoshana Greenberger

The Department of Dermatology, Sheba Medical Center Israel

Bio:

Prof. Greenberger is the director of Pediatric Dermatology service at The Edmond and Lily Safra Children's Hospital, Sheba Medical Center, and an Associate Professor at Sackler faculty of medicine Tel-Aviv University. She received her medical degree from the Hebrew University in Jerusalem and her PhD from Tel‐Aviv University, Israel. After completing her residency in Dermatology at Sheba Medical Center in Israel she was a post‐doctoral fellow at the Children's Hospital Boston and Harvard Medical School. Her clinical interests are pediatric dermatology, inflammatory dermatoses,vascular anomalies and genodermatoses. Her research lab in Sheba Medical Center focuses on pathological angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis.

 

Title:

Abstract:

Prof. Boni Elewski

Professor and Chair, James Elder Endowed Professor of Graduate Medical EducationUniversity of Alabama
USA

Bio:

Dr. Boni Elewski, an Ohio native, started her career at Ohio State University College of Medicine, where she earned her medical degree.  She completed an internship in internal medicine and residency in dermatology at University of North Carolina Memorial Hospital, and she held faculty positions at Northeastern Ohio University College of Medicine and Case Western Reserve School of Medicine, before joining UAB faculty in 1999.  Currently, Dr. Elewski serves as the Chair for UAB’s Department of Dermatology and the Program Director for the Dermatology Residency Program, where she has been a professor for the past seventeen years. She holds the James E. Elder M.D. Endowed Professorship for Graduate Education. As an international leader in fungal and psoriasis research and dermatological clinical trials, she has conducted clinical trials through her entire career and has received 85 clinical trial study grants to pursue therapies for many dermatologic conditions.  Dr. Boni Elewski is the author of more than 300 publications and has an esteemed history of serving in numerous national societies and professional organizations, including president of the American Academy of Dermatology from 2004-2005.

 

Title:

Abstract:

Dr. Eran Galili

Department of Dermatology, Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Israel

Bio:

Eran Galili, MD, received his medical degree from Tel Aviv University. He completed his residency in dermatology at Sheba Medical Center, Israel. Later, Dr. Galili was trained in nail surgery under the supervision of Prof. Eckart Haneke.

Currently, Dr. Eran Galili is a senior physician at Sheba Medical Center where he serves as an attending physician at the nail and fungal skin diseases clinic. He also specializes in laser therapy at Sheba's advanced technology center.

Dr. Galili is a member of the European Nail Society (ENS) and the author of more than 15 peer-reviewed publications.

Title:

Abstract:

Dr. Shamir Geller

Division of Dermatology, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Israel

Bio:

Shamir Geller, M.D.

Director of the Dermatology Outpatient Clinics, Division of Dermatology, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Senior clinical lecturer, Sackler Medical School, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel

 

Shamir Geller received his MD from Tel-Aviv University. He specialized in dermatology at Tel-Aviv Sourasky Medical Center (TASMC). He spent a research fellowship at the Dermatology and Allergology Department in the Universitätsklinikum Gießen und Marburg, Germany studying novel diagnostic methods in autoimmune blistering diseases. He spent three years at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, USA for a cutaneous oncology fellowship focusing on cutaneous lymphoma. Upon his return to Tel-Aviv, he became the director of the outpatient dermatology clinics and a senior physician in the cutaneous lymphoma clinic at TASMC. He has co-authored almost 60 scientific publications, has mentored students and residents. His research focuses on diagnostic techniques and epidemiology of lymphomas of the skin and other skin cancers.

 

Title:

Lecture 1:
Nail irregularities in patients with cutaneous T-cell lymphomas

Abstract:

Abstract 1

Irregularities of the nails in patients with cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL) are frequently overlooked and underreported. Nail irregularities may be seen in advanced-stage mycosis fungoides (MF) and in Sezary syndrome (SS), the most common CTCL subtypes of cutaneous T cell lymphoma, and rarely in early stages of the disease. Nail abnormalities in CTCL may be related to the underlying disease, to superimposed infection or due to therapy, specifically phototherapy, PUVA, radiation, and chemotherapy. The spectrum of nail changes in SS patients include nail thickening, onychodystrophy, yellow discoloration, subungual hyperkeratosis, onychomadesis, trachyonychia, onycholysis, paronychia and leukonychia. Nail changes have been reported to be present in 30% of all MF patients with longitudinal ridging, nail thickening, nail fragility, and leukonychia being the most common nail irregularities seen in MF patients. Based on our experience and the literature, nail irregularities in patients with MF and SS are heterogenous, are not uncommon, and may be used as a clinical clue of CTCL diagnosis. Further studies are needed to better understand nail involvement in CTCL and its treatment.

Prof. Aditya K. Gupta

Department of Medicine (Division of Dermatology), University of Toronto, Canada

Bio:

Aditya K. Gupta, MD, received his medical degree from the University of Southampton, UK.  He completed a dermatology residency/clinical research fellowship at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, and has received a PhD from the University of Göteborg, Sweden. Dr. Gupta is a Professor of Dermatology at the University of Toronto. Dr. Gupta has a well-established dermatology practice in London, Ontario, Canada specializing in but by no means restricted to the field of onychomycosis, which also contains a clinical trials unit. Dr. Gupta’s reputation in the field of mycology has been achieved throughout his career. Dr. Gupta has over 800 publications, is on 15 journal editorial boards, and reviews for over 35 journals. He is a Diplomate of the American Board of Dermatology; he is also a Fellow of the American Academy of Dermatology.

 

Title:

Lecture 1:
Antifungal Resistance – Should we be concerned?

Lecture 2:
An Update on Oral Antifungals to Treat Onychomycosis

Abstract:

Abstract 1:

 

This presentation will describe dermatophytosis epidemiology and changes seen relating to treatment resistance. The evolution of resistance is described, including factors in resistance development. Treatment for dermatophytosis is reviewed, including resistant dermatophytosis. There are many newer therapies which may assist in resistant infections, either as monotherapy or in combination with traditional antifungal agents. Strategies to prevent resistance can be implemented, including susceptibility testing of causative agents. Increased resistance indicates a need for antifungal stewardship programs for dermatophytosis: principles of stewardship will be discussed.

 

 

Abstract 2: 

 

The common oral antifungal agents used to treat onychomycosis are terbinafine and itraconazole. Fluconazole is prescribed off-label. Recently there have been reports of poor response or resistance to oral terbinafine. There is evidence that oral antifungal agents approved for systemic fungal infections may also be effective for onychomycosis. Use of these newer antifungals (voriconazole, posaconazole, albaconazole, fosravuconazole, and oteseconazole) will be discussed. Recommendation for the most appropriate dosing regimens, and guidelines for monitoring, will be reviewed for both common agents and the newer agents.

Prof. Eckart Haneke

Department of Dermatology, Inselspital, University Bern, Switzerland

Bio:

Study of medicine at the Medical Faculty, Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg in Halle/Saale 1960-1966

Internship in Internal Medicine, Surgery (traumatology), and Physiological Chemistry 1966-1967

Dermatology training at Dept Dermatol, Martin-Luther-University Halle 1967-1971, board certification 1971

Senior resident till Jan 1973

General practitioner at Arnstein/Unterfranken 1973-1974

Dept Dermatol Univ Erlangen 1975-1986: Senior resident 1975, Ass Prof 1975-1978, Docent 1978-1979, Associate Prof 1980-1986

Professor and chairman, Dept Dermatol Wuppertal Hosp, Acad Teaching Hosp Univs Düsseldorf and Witten-Herdecke 1986-2000

Head, Inst Dermatol, Klinikk Bunaes, Sandvika, Oslo, Norway 2000-2004

Dermatologist, Dermatol Clin „Dermaticum“, Kaiser-Joseph-Strasse, Freiburg, Germany, since 2004

Honorary Consultant, Dept Dermatol, Univ Med Ctr St Radboud, Nijmegen, Netherlands, 2004-2005

Visiting professor, Dept Dermatol, Univ Berne, Switzerland, since 2005

Senior Consultant, Dept Dermatol, Acad Hosp, Univ Ghent, Belgium, since 2006

Senior Consultant, Centro de Dermatologia, Instituto CUF, Porto, Portugal, since 2008

 

MD: Univ Halle 1968 (Thesis: Fluorescence histochemical demonstration of adrenergic nerves in the portio vaginalis uteri)

PhD: Univ Erlangen 1978 (PhD Thesis: Glossodynia – clinical, histopathological, histomorphometric measurements, aetiopathogenetic management)

Associate professor: Erlangen 1979

Clinical professor: Erlangen 1980

 

Special interests

Dermatopathology, dermatological surgery, nail diseases, diseases of the oral mucosa, aesthetic dermatology

 

Publications

>400 journal articles, >190 book chapters, author of 8 books, co-editor of 10 books, >1600 lectures at national and international meetings

Reviewer for Arch Dermatol/JAMA Dermatol, Br J Dermatol, Eur J Dermatol, Hautarzt, J Am Acad Dermatol, J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol, J German Soc Dermatol, Fungi, J Cut Pathol, etc.

Member of the editorial board of several peer-reviewed journals

Advisory Board: Dermatol Med Quir Cosm, J Turk Acad Dermatol

>30 dermatol surgery courses in 5 continents

>25 nail surgery courses in 4 continents

 

Societies

German Dermatol Soc, German Soc Dermatol Surg (Founding member, long-term board of directors, past vice-president), Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol, French Soc Dermatol Venereol (Corresponding Member), Austrian Soc Dermatol (Corresponding member), German Working Group Dermatohistopathol (Past President), Asoc Colomb Dermatol (Honorary member), German Mycol Soc, Mex Soc Dermatol Surg (Hon Member), Turk Dermatol Soc (Hon Memb), Pol Soc Dermatol (Hon Memb), Int Soc Dermatol Surg (Past President), Eur Nail Soc (Past President), Eur Soc Cosm Aesthet Dermatol (Past Pres), Dermatol Surg Group Swiss Soc Dermatol Venereol (Hon Member), Asociación Argentina de Medicina y Cirugía Cosmética (Hon Member), Hellenic Soc Dermatol Surg (Hon Member), Romanian Soc Dermatol (Hon Member), Swiss Soc Dermatol Venereol (Corresponding Member), Slovak Soc Med Branch of Aesthet Cosm Dermatol (Honorary Member), Swiss Soc Dermatol Venereol (Honorary Member), Roman Soc Dermatopathol (Honorary member), Soc Mex Tricol (Honorary Member).

Title:

Lecture 1:
Lecture 1: Longitudinal Melanonychia with or without Hutchinson's Nail Sign and Different Nail Pigmented Lesions, from where Exactly Should the Biopsy be taken?

Lecture 2:
Lecture 2: Surgical approach for retronychia

Lecture 3
Lecture 3: Conservative and/or Surgical Approach for Pincer Nails and Ingrown Toenails

Abstract:

Longitudinal Melanonychia with or without Hutchinson's Nail Sign and Different Pigmented Nail Lesions - from where Exactly Should the Biopsy be taken?

 

Eckart Haneke

 

Department of Dermatology, Inselspital, University of Berne, Bern, Switzerland

Dermatology Practice Dermaticum. Freiburg, Germany

Centro de Dermatología Epidermis, Instituto CUF, Matosinhos, Porto, Portugal

 

Nail pigmentations are always of concern as approximately three quarters of nail melanomas start with a brown to black longitudinal band in the nail. However, a longitudinal band due to melanin can only develop when there is a melanocyte focus in the matrix producing more melanin than the matrix keratinocytes can physiologically degrade. Thus, a biopsy has to be taken from the matrix and not from the nail plate or the nail bed. Any melanocyte lesion in the nail bed even when producing excess melanin cannot give the pigment into the nail plate and will thus only be visible as a dark spot under the nail and not as a brown streak.

Hutchinson’s sign is periungual pigmentation due to abnormal melanocyte activity or number. This periungual pigmentation although described in 1886 by Sir Jonathan Hutchinson as “melanotic whitlow” in association with “melanotic sarcoma” can be observed in also other lesions, both benign and malignant. Thus nowadays, benign and malignant periungual pigmentation is differentiated and the malignant one may be due to melanoma or Bowen’s disease. The cellular alterations seen in Hutchinson’s sign may be very subtle and their exact recognition requires a lot of experience by the dermatopathologist as well as good clinico-pathologic correlation. Pigment shining through the thin cuticle and free margin of the nail fold is called pseudo-Hutchinson. Both Hutchinson and pseudo-Hutchinson sign must be differentiated from non-melanin pigmentation.

These facts explain why a biopsy of longitudinal melanonychia both without and with Hutchinson’s sign has to be taken from the matrix and not from the nail bed or periungual pigmentation.

Abstract 1:

 

Abstract 2:

 

Surgical approach for retronychia and onychomycosis

 

Eckart Haneke

 

Department of Dermatology, Inselspital, University of Berne, Bern, Switzerland

Dermatology Practice Dermaticum. Freiburg, Germany

Centro de Dermatología Epidermis, Instituto CUF, Matosinhos, Porto, Portugal

 

Retrograde ingrowing of the proximal nail plate is called retronychia. It was only described 23 years ago, and it took another 10 years before 12 more cases had been described. Now, far more than 200 cases have been reported.

Three different types of retronychia can be distinguished. The least frequent but most impressive type occurs after a single heavy trauma that disrupts the attachment of the plate to the matrix (and nail bed) and pushes the nail back into the nail pocket. The proximal nail margin pierces the skin in the depth of the cul-de-sac, which leads to granulation tissue. The nail does not regrow properly forward but builds up stacks of new nail due to repeated traumatic separation of the nail from the matrix.

The commonest type is due to repeated trauma, which leads to very marked onycholysis. This allows the nail to be pushed back with each compression thus loosing its attachment to the matrix. Each backward movement causes a horizontal fracture of the nail from the matrix and the lack of nail bed attachment causes a new nail layer to be formed until many layers of nail are laid one upon the other. The oldest proximal nail margin hardens and its margin becomes very hard and sharp cutting into the undersurface of the proximal nail fold. This is eventually pierced giving rise to granulation tissue, which may even protrude from under the free edge of the nail fold.

Another not well-known type is the chronic non-inflammatory retronychia. The nail is discolored, markedly curved in its longitudinal axis, its surface shows multiple deep transverse arched splits making the nail look like a horse-shoe crab or back of a shrimp. Close inspection of the toe reveals a marked onycholysis, and a huge distal bulge that is often barely visible under this malformed nail. Cutting away the non-adherend nail reveals a tremendously shortened nail bed, which is deeply depressed.

The treatment of choice of retronychia is nail avulsion in the two first types followed by consistent taping to hold the hyponychium and distal nail bed down. In mild cases, topical steroid may be tried or intralesional steroid injection.

Onychomycosis is a fungal infection of the nail apparatus. Contrary to common belief it is in most cases not the nail plate that is infected but the nail bed. The commonest variant, the distal-lateral onychomycosis, makes up for more than 85% of all onychomycoses. Here, the pathogenic fungus invades the nail bed from the tip of the digit via the hyponychium. The infected nail bed responds to the irritation by the infection with the development of nail bed hyperkeratosis where the vast majority of the fungi is found. The fungus can only slowly advance further proximal against the direction of growth of the nail plate. At times when no efficacious antifungal drugs were available nail avulsion was often performed; however this is a useless torture for the patient as this “treatment” is based on the wrong assumption that the nail plate is the target of the fungus. Once the nail plate has been avulsed there is no counter-movement by the nail anymore and the fungus can spread rapidly. Further, nail avulsion is the most severe iatrogenic nail trauma, and it is known that trauma is one of the most important predisposing factors the development of onychomycoses. Nail avulsion may very rarely be of benefit but only as the start of an intensive antifungal therapy.

 

Abstract 3:

 

 

Conservative and/or Surgical Approach for Ingrown Toenails and Pincer Nails

 

Eckart Haneke1,2,3 & Anna Stovbyr4

 

1 Department of Dermatology, Inselspital, University of Berne, Bern, Switzerland

2 Dermatology Practice Dermaticum. Freiburg, Germany

3 Centro de Dermatología Epidermis, Instituto CUF, Matosinhos, Porto, Portugal

4 Klinik Evroderm, Kiew, Uktaine

 

Ingrown toenails (unguis incarnatus, onychocryptosis) and pincer nails (transverse overcurvature, trumpet nail, omega nail, unguis constringens) are very common. Ingrown toenail occur in different clinical varieties and at any age.

In the newborn, they are due to short nails that have not yet overgrown the tip of the big toe. They are treated by gentle massage of the toes in warm bath.

A hypertrophic lateral or medial lip is an inborn hypertrophy of one or both lateral nail folds. Again, the first treatment is gentle massage. If this is not successful, the hypertrophic fold may be removed with an electric loop, which takes some seconds to do. The small wound rapidly heals by secondary intention.

Congenital malalignment of the big toenail is not so rare. The nail’s long axis is deviated laterally in relation to the axis of the distal phalanx. This may have no further consequences or may be associated with discoloration of the nail, transverse ridging, thickening of the plate, a triangular shape with medial kinking of the plate. In these cases, gently probing under the plate reveals very marked onycholysis, which is the single most important prognostic factor. Cutting the onycholytic plate back demonstrates a distal bulge and an extremely short nail bed. The initial treatment should be conservative with taping to redress the distal bulge, correct the distal interphalangeal hallux valgus and the nail growth direction. If this is done by the parents there is a very good chance of improvement. When this fails after consistent treatment of at least two years surgery may be performed to rotate the axis of the nail into that of the distal phalanx.

The most common type of unguis incarnatus is seen in school children, adolescents and young adults. The nail is wide, usually markedly curved, the lateral-distal edge has pierced the distal nail groove and caused granulation tissue. Conservative therapy is by taping, packing, gutter insertion, nail braces and many more techniques and has a good success rate when performed consistently. However, patient counseling to avoid recurrences is of utmost importance. If this fails surgery is indicated. In our hands and now world-wide, narrowing of the nail plate by selective segmental matrix horn ablation is the treatment of choice. This may be done by chemical cautery with 88% phenol, which has a success rate of 99% in experienced hands. Altrnatives are 10% sodium hydroxide and 85 – 100% trichloracetic acid. The postoperative care is very important as this is what has the biggest influence on the healing time. If there is a very marked hypertrophy of the lateral nail folds, they may be reduced with radical excision according to Vandenbos or with the super-U technique. These techniques do not narrow the nail matrix.

Pincer nails are characterized by a distally increasing transverse overcurvature of toenails. The genetic type shows symmetric involvement of the big toenails associated with lateral deviation and often also of some lesser toenails then associated with medial deviation. The cause is a widening of the base of the distal phalanx by lateral osteophytes on the condyles of the distal phalanx. In mild forms, unbending the nails with nail braces and a variety of other orthonyx devices is helpful. However, as this is not a therapy according to the pathomechanism the braces have virtually to be kept years if not life-long.  Surgery of moderate cases aims at taking the outward pressure on the root of the nail away by bilateral matrix horn cautery. Severe cases require an additional nail bed plasty to flatten the pinched nail bed. If the curvature exceeds 360° and is symptomatic complete nail phenolization may be performed.

Dr. Felix Pavlotsky

Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Israel

Bio:

  • Graduate of Faculty of Medicine, the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel
  • Residence in Oncology and Dermatology
  • Head of Psoriasis and Phototherapy Center, Dermatology, Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel- Hashomer, Israel.
  • Senior lecturer at Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Israel       
  • Head of the Israeli Dermatology Board Committee           

Title:

Lecture 1:
Lecture 1: Nail Psoriasis – Can We Help More Today?

Abstract:

Abstract 1:

Nail involvement is the "black sheep" of the generally successful psoriasis treatment. The role of traditional remedies in this aspect, as summarized at the previous meeting, is limited.

 

The newer biologic therapies achieve a very impressive results with skin component. Are those therapies have the same effectiveness for the nail component?

 

The latest data and their critical analysis will be presented along with possible future directions.

Dr. Lev Pavlovski

Rabin Medical Center, Israel

Bio:

Title:

Abstract:

Dr.Vered Molho Pessach

Department of Dermatology, Hadasah, Medical Center, Jerusalem, Israel

Bio:

Vered Molho-Pessach, MD

After concluding her Dermatology residency at the Department of Dermatology of Hadassah- Hebrew University Medical Center in Jerusalem, Israel in 2009, Dr. Vered Molho-Pessach performed her fellowship in Pediatric Dermatology at the Department of Dermatology, New York University, NYC. Later, in 2011, Dr. Molho-Pessach was a research fellow at Dr. Helen Hobbs laboratory at the McDermot Center for Human Genetics, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX.  During the last ten years Dr. Molho-Pessach has been working as a senior dermatologist at the Department of Dermatology of Hadassah-Hebrew University Medical Center. She is Head of the Pediatric Dermatology Service at the Hadassah-Hebrew University Medical Center.  Dr. Molho-Pessach serves as the treasurer of the Israeli Dermatological Association and as the secretary of the Israeli Pediatric Dermatology Society.  She is a senior lecturer at the Hebrew University Faculty of Medicine.  

Title:

Lecture 1:
Common Pediatric Nail Disorders

Abstract:

Prof. Bianca Maria Piraccini

Dermatological Unit Alma Mater Studiorum University of Bologna, Italy

Bio:

Prof. Bianca Maria Piraccini

 

Professor in Dermatology, University of Bologna, Ialy

Head of the Dermatological Unit Alma Mater Studiorum University of Bologna, Italy

President of the European Hair Research Society

Past-president of the European Nail Society

 

Prof. Piraccini is the author of 382 Journal articles (of which 348 on PubMed), 45 Chapters of Volumes and 11 monographs on dermatological diseases.

She has participated in and participates in numerous national and international congresses and courses where she is often a speaker.

Title:

Lecture 1:
Nail Dermoscopy

Lecture 2:
Nail Lichen Planus – Practical Therapeutic Approach

Lecture 3:
Onychomycosis

Abstract:

Abstract 1

Bianca Maria Piraccini

Division of Dermatology

Department of Experimental, Diagnostic and Specialty Medicine-, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy

 

The use of dermoscopy in nail disorders (also known as ‘onychoscopy’) is quite recent. Initially utilized for the study of nail pigmentations, nail dermoscopy has gradually become more and more frequently used to observe other types of neoplastic and non- neoplastic nail disorders.

The particular anatomy of the nail apparatus makes dermoscopy nor easy to perform and difficult to be interpreted. In most of the cases, dermoscopy only enhances signs already visible with the naked eye, acting only as an illuminated magnifying lens, but the features it shows are anyway very fascinating and unique.

All nail symptoms can be observed by dermoscopy, which enhances visualization of details and may help the diagnosis.

 

 

 

 

Abstract 2

Bianca Maria Piraccini

Division of Dermatology

Department of Experimental, Diagnostic and Specialty Medicine-, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy

 

Nail lichen planus is a benign inflammatory disorder of unknow etiology that may present as an isolated variant or associated with other parts of the body such as skin, scalp and mucosae. Nail lichen planus may induce a scarring outcome if the diagnosis and the treatment are delayed. Therefore, prompt diagnosis and treatment are essential. The choice of therapy is difficult and selected on the basis of the different manifestations. In addition, recurrence is high.  Clinically nail lichen planus may have different presentation depend on whether the inflammation is in the nail matrix, nail bed or both. Until now, it cannot be definitely diagnosed without a nail biopsy. Onychoscopy may be useful to better observe nail plate alterations that makes nail matrix or nail bed more likely. No guidelines exist for the treatment of nail lichen planus and published literature is limited to case series and expert opinions. Treatment of nail lichen planus is based on steroids, which can be locally injected if 1-3 nails are involved, or are prescribed systemically. Treatment should last 4-5 months and then be tapered off. Fingernails respond quicker then toenails, which may remain thickener for a long time. The prognosis of lichen planus is variable. 1/3 of the patients do not respond to therapy. A possible alternative for these cases may be immunomodulating therapy or etanercept as biological treatment.

 

 

 

Lecture 3

Bianca Maria Piraccini

Division of Dermatology

Department of Experimental, Diagnostic and Specialty Medicine-, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy

 

Onychomycosis is the most common nail infective disorder. It’s caused mainly by anthropophilic dermatophytes, in particular by Trichophyton rubrum and T. mentagrophytes var. interdigitale. Yeasts, like Candida albicans and C. parapsilosis, and molds, like Aspergillus spp., represent the second cause of onychomycosis. The clinical suspect of onychomycosis should be confirmed my mycology. Onychoscopy is a new method that can help the physician, as in onychomycosis it shows a typical fringed proximal margin. Treatment is chosen depending on the modality of nail invasion, fungus species and the number of affected nails. Oral treatments are often limited by drug interactions, while topical antifungal lacquers have less efficacy. A combination of both oral and systemic treatment is often the best choice.

 

 

 

 

Prof. Eli Sprecher

Division of Dermatology, Tel Aviv Medical center, Israel

Bio:

Eli Sprecher chairs the Division of Dermatology at the Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center where he also serves as Deputy Director for Research and Development. He is Frederick Reiss Professor of Dermatology at the Medical School, Tel Aviv University.  He received an MD degree from the Hebrew University, a PhD degree in Molecular Virology from the Hebrew University and an MBA degree from Tel Aviv University. He also spent a post-doctoral fellowship in Human Genetics at the Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia.  His research focuses on the genetic basis of skin diseases. He has co-authored over 350 scientific publications, has earned several patents, and has received numerous national and international prizes and honors.

Title:

Lecture 1:
Inherited disorders of the nail unit: from genes to patient care

Abstract:

Abstract 1

The past years have witnessed dramatic advances in our understanding of the genetic basis of hereditary nail disorders. Through the study of these conditions, we have gained much insight into the nature and role of key mediators of nail growth and differentiation. This new knowledge has not only far reaching implications for the counseling of individuals at risk for inherited nail diseases, it often bears critical implications for the management of those patients.    

 

Dr. Michal Ramon

Rambam medical center,Haifa,Israel

Bio:

CURRICULUM  VITAE AND LIST OF PUBLICATIONS

 

CURRICULUM VITAE

 

PERSONAL  DETAILS

 

Name: Michal Ramon,  M.D.

 

Present Appointment:  Senior Dermatologist, in charge of the phototherapy        and psoriasis day care center and clinical research

                                    

                                      Department of Dermatology,

 

                                      Rambam Health Care Campus

                                     8 Ha'Aliya St.,POB 9602,

 

                                     Haifa, 31096 Israel.

 

Date and Place of  Birth: November 13,1958; Haifa , Israel.

 

Family Status: Married + 3.

                                                                                   

Citizenship and Identity Card Number:  Israeli  5545998-6.

 

Passport Number: 32972287

 

Permanent Home Address: 51 Margalit st., Haifa, Israel 3446429.

 

Home Telephone Number: 04-8343271, 050-2063228

 

Telefax Number: 04-8263524

 

E-mail : m_ramon@rambam.health.gov.il

             Michalramon14@gmail.com

 

 EDUCATION

 

Education: Eironi G, Haifa. Graduated  in 1976.

 

Medical Education: The Technion - Faculty of Medicine, Haifa, Israel.

                                  1976 - 1982.

                              

Academic Degree: M.D., The Faculty of Medicine, Technion-Israel Institute of   Technology, Haifa, Israel, 1989.

 

 

Certifications:  Med. Licencse # 020280, 1989.

                 

                         ECFMG #414-579-3.

 

                         Board Certified Dermatologist, March,20, 1995.

                           #14168

 

GCP training  -  Haifa university - 2008

Post Graduate Training:     

 

1/1983 - 1/1984        Internship, Haemek, Central Hospital, Afula, Israel.

 

2/1984 - 3/1989      Service in the Medical Corps, Israel Defense Forces.

 

3/1989 - 3/1990      Resident in Anesthesiology, Rambam Medical Center.

 

4/1990 - 3/1995      Residency in Dermatology, Rambam Medical Center.

 

6/1993                      Israel Board  Examination  in   Dermatology, Stage A.

 

11/ 1994                   Israel Board   Examination  in Dermatology, Stage B.

 

2007-2008                       Clinical trials management, Haifa university

 

Appointments:

 

1989  - 1990   Residency in Anesthesiology.

 

1990  - 1995   Residency in Dermatology.

 

1998-2002-   Lt. Cdr.,  Medical Corps,  Israel Defense Forces (I.D.F.).

 

Teaching Experience:

 

1986 - 1988   Lectures and instruction to Medical personnel in the I.D.F.

 

  1. - 2021 Teaching courses in dermatology to medical students,

                  Department of Dermatology, Faculty of Medicine, Technion -

                  Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel

 

1998-2019         Instruction of nurse students in Dermatology.

 

2000- 2019       Lectures in post graduate courses in dermatology,

                         Medical school, Tel Aviv University

 

2002-2004          Lectures in dermatology  for post graduate family physicians

                             Haifa University       

 

Research Experience:

 

1992-1993-      Clinical research on   onychomycosis

 

1993 - 1994 - Clinical research on Kaposi's Sarcoma.

 

1996-1998 – Clinical research on acne vulgaris

 

1996-1997   - Clinical  research    on Herpes simplex and Herpes Zoster infections.

1998-current  -   Clinical research on Psoriasis

2002- current – Clinical research on epidermolysis bullosa

2002- current - Clinical research on pemphigus vulgaris

2018-current- clinical research on alopecia areata

2016-current- clinical research on atopic dermatitis

 

Administrative Experience:

 

Coordination and  management of large scale projects during military service.

 

Service as Chief  Physician of women soldier of North Israel Defense forces .

 

Service as Chief  Physician of Haifa  recruitment office.

 

Management of  out patient military clinic

 

Management of clinical trials in dermatology

 

Advisory board  participation

 

2013-current  :Psoriaisis treatment

2015 - Hidtradenitis treatment

2016- cutaneous T cell lymphoma treatment

2018- solar keratosis

2018-Atopic dermatitis

 

Membership in prefessional Societies :     

 

  1996- current           Israel Medical Association.

 

  1996-current           Israel Soceity of Dermatologyl and Venerology

Society.

2011-current             Israeli society of psoriasis

 

1996-current             International society of Dermatology and  venerology   

                 

1996-current                Member of the American Academy of Dermatology

 

                                     ME#  00000071786

                                    

                                     Member of the American  Photodermatology society

 

                                     Member of Woman Dermatology  society

2018- current- European society of dermatoloy  and venerology

 

 

Active Participation in  International Conferences:

 

1. 18th world congress of Dermatology, New-York, 1992.

 

    Paper: Mutilating Hypertrophic  Lupus Vulgaris in an Ethiopian new immigrant.

 

    M. Ramon, O. Biterman, S. Weltfriend, R. Bergman & R. Friedman-

 

    Birnbaum.

 

2. Annual Meeting of the American Academy of  Dermatology, San-Francisco, 1997.

 

 

3. Biology and Therapy of Inflammatory Skin Diseases: An International Symposium

    at the Dead Sea. November, 1997.

    Poster: Corticosteroids and Cyclosporin as an Initial Therapy in Pemphigus Vulgaris:

 

   Compared to Conventional Therapy.

 

   M. Ramon, R. Friedman-Birnbaum & R. Bergman. 

 

4. Annual Meeting of the American Academy of  Dermatology, Orlando, 1998.

 

    Poster: Hyperbaric Oxygen (HBO) Therapy for Lower Limb Wound Complication

 

    at the Vein Donor Site After Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Surgery.

 

   Y. Ramon, Y. Melamed, A. Shupak, M. Ramon and I. J. Pel

 

 

 

Active Participation in  National Conferences:

 

1. The  Annual Meeting of Israel Dermatological Society, 1991.

 

   a. Paper: A Clinical study of Erithrodermic patients  during the last twenty

       

        years in the department of Dermatology, Rambam Medical Center/                                                 

 

       L. Zuker, R. Bergman,  M. Ramon, & R. Friedman-Birnbaum.

 

   b. Paper: Granulomatous Rosacea

   

      M. Ramon , R. Bergman & R. Friedman-Birnbaum.

 

  c. Paper: Fox-Fordyce Disease.

 

      M. Ramon , R. Bergman & R. Friedman-Birnbaum.

     

 

2. The  Annual Meeting of Israel Dermatological Society, 1992.

 

  a. Paper: Myasis caused by Dermatobia Hominis.

 

     M. Ramon , D. Mertzbach, O. Biterman  & R. Friedman-Birnbaum.

 

   b. Paper: Muir-Torre Syndrome.

 

      M. Ramon , B. Zamir, O. Biterman  & R. Bergman.

 

    c. Paper: The importance of patch test readings beyond day two.

 

        M. Ramon , S. Weltfriend & R. Friedman-Birnbaum.

 

   3. The first national conference of the Israeli Society of Vulvovaginal Disease,

     

        Herzeliya, 1992.

 

      Paper: Papular  acantholytic dyskeratosis  of the vulva.

   

      R. Bergman, M. Friedman, I. Kats,  M. Ramon, & R. Friedman-Birnbaum.

 

  4. The Annual Meeting of Israel Dermatological Society, 1993.

 

   Paper: Dystrophic calcinosis Cutis.

 

   M. Ramon, R. Bergman, Y. Ullmann, I. J. Peled, G. Elroi & R. Friedman-

 

   Birnbaum.

 

5. The Annual Meeting of Israel Dermatological Society, 1994.

 

    a. Paper: Pemphigus Vulgaris treated by Cyclosporin and Prednison - Three

 

        year follow-up.

 

         M. Ramon , R. Bergman & R. Friedman-Birnbaum.

     

     b. Paper: Prognostic factors in Kaposi's Sarcoma.

 

          M. Ramon  & R. Friedman-Birnbaum.

     

6. The Annual Meeting of Israel Dermatological Society, 1995.

 

  a.  Paper: Immuno histochemical expression of P53 in Kaposi's Sarcoma.

 

       M. Ramon , R. Bergman, S. Kilin, C. Lichtig &  R. Friedman-Birnbaum.

     

   b. Paper: Lymphomatoid Papulosis.

 

       A. Dascalu, R. Bergman, M. Ramon & R. Friedman-Birnbaum.

 

 

 

 

 

   c. Paper: Self Regressing Primary Cutaneous CD30+ Large Cell T-Cell

     

       Lymphoma.

 

      D. Faclieru, R. Bergman, M. Ramon & R. Friedman-Birnbaum.

 

     d. Paper: Perilesional Injection of GM-CSF for Kaposi's Sarcoma.

  

         M. Ramon , R. Bergman & R. Friedman-Birnbaum

 

 

 

 

   

              

 

 

 

 

LIST OF PUBLICATIONS

 

 

1. Ramon M.

    Actigraphic sleep patterns in normal pregnant women in comparison to a

    control group. ( M.D. Thesis).

 

2. Dystrophic calcinosis Cutis. European  Journal of Plastic Surgery, 1995.

    M. Ramon, R. Bergman, Y. Ullmann, I. J. Peled, G. Elroi & R. Friedman-

    Birnbaum.

 

3. An immuno histochemical study of P53 protein expression in classical Kaposi's

     Sarcoma.

R. Bergman, M. Ramon , S. Kilin, C. Lichtig &  R. Friedman-Birnbaum.

S. Am J. Dermatopathol. 18(4) : 367, 1996.

 

4. Bergman R., David R., Ramon Y., Ramon M., Kerner H., Killim S., Peled I.

    & Friedman-birnbaum R.

    Delayed postburn blisters: an immuno-histochemical and ultrastructural study.

    J. cutan. Pathol. 24:429-433 , 1997.

 

5.Sprecher E, Bergman R, Szargel R, Raz T, Labay  V, Ramon M, Friedman-Birenbaum,Cohen N

 

6.Atrichia with papular lesions maps to 8p in the region containing the human hairless gene.

Eli Sprecher 1 2, Reuven Bergman 1, Raymonde Szargel 2, Tal Raz 2, Valentina Labay 2, Michal Ramon 1, Ruth Baruch-Gershoni 3, Rachel Friedman-Birnbaum 1, Nadine Cohen 1

 

American journal of medical genetics 80:546-550 1998.

 
 

7.Leishmania tropica in northern Israel: A clinical overview of an emerging focus , 07 September 2005
Ayelet Shani-Adir, Stephanie Kamil, Dganit Rozenman, Eli Schwartz, Michal Ramon, Lucia Zalman, Abed Nasereddin, Charles L. Jaffe, Moshe Ephros
Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology
November 2005 (Vol. 53, Issue 5, Pages 810-815)

8. Clinicopathologic reassessment of non-mycosis fungoides primary cutaneous lymphomas during 17 years (p 735-743)
Reuven Bergman, Bat-Sheva Marcus-Farber, Lena Manov, Ina Nerodinisky, Ron Epelbaum, Dvorah Sahar, Rinat Schein-Goldschmid, Michal Ramon, Yehudith Ben-Arieh

Int j dermatol Volume 41 Issue 11 , Pages 721 - 826 (November 2002)

 

 

 9.Phenotypic Diversity and Mutation Spectrum in Hypotrichosis with Juvenile Macular Dystrophy

Margarita Indelman, Christian P Hamel, Reuven Bergman, Ken K Nischal, Dorothy Thompson, Marie-Odile Surget, Michal Ramon, Hatam Ganthos*, Benjamin Miller*, Gabriele Richard§, Raziel Lurie, Rina Leibu*, Isabelle Russell-Eggitt and Eli SprecherJournal of Investigative Dermatology (2003) 121, 1217–1220;

Journal of Investigative Dermatology advance online publication 27 August 2009; doi: 10.1038/jid.2009.265

10.Insulin-Like Growth Factor-Binding Protein 7 Regulates Keratinocyte Proliferation, Differentiation and Apoptosis

Janna Nousbeck1,2, Ofer Sarig2, Nili Avidan1, Margarita Indelman3, Reuven Bergman3, Michal Ramon3, Claes D Enk4 and Eli Sprecher1,2

11.Low Dose Methotrexate Therapy is Effective in Late-Onset Atopic Dermatitis and Idiopathic Eczema

Lilach Zoller MD, Michal Ramon MD and Reuven Bergman MD•  Israeli journal of dermatol Vol 10 • 413-414 June 2008

 

12. Psoriasis patients generate increased serum levels of autoantibodies to tumor necrosis factor α and interferon α.

R Bergman, M Ramon, G Willdbaum, E AvitanHeresh, E Mayer, A Shemer, N Karin

J dermatol Sience 56 (2009)163-167

13.Nousbeck J,Sarig O, Avidan n, Idelman M, Bergman R, Ramon M, Enk CD, Sprecher E. IGBP -7 regulates keratinocyte proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. J Invest Dermatol,in press

14. Atopic dermatitis (AD) keratinocytes exhibit normal Th17 cytokine responses

Kristine E. Nograles, MD,1 Mayte Suárez-Fariñas, PhD,1 Avner Shemer, MD,2 Judilyn Fuentes-Duculan, MD,1 Andrea Chiricozzi, MD,1,3 Irma Cardinale, MSc,1 Lisa C. Zaba, MD, PhD,1 Toyoko Kikuchi, MSc,1 Michal Ramon, MD,4 Reuven Bergman, MD,4 James G. Krueger, MD, PhD,1 and Emma G e2uttman-Yassky, MD, MSc1,5

J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2010 Mar; 125(3): 744–746.

15. IL-22 producing “T22” T-cells account for up-regulated IL-22 in atopic dermatitis (AD), despite reduced IL-17 producing Th17 T-cells

Kristine E. Nograles, MD,1,* Lisa C. Zaba, PhD,1,* Avner Shemer, MD,2 Judilyn Fuentes-Duculan, MD,1 Irma Cardinale, MSc,1 Toyoko Kikuchi, MSc,1 Michal Ramon, MD,3 Reuven Bergman, MD,3 James G. Krueger, MD PhD,1 and Emma Guttman-Yassky, MD MSc

J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2009 Jun; 123(6): 1244–52.e2.

J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol. 2020 Jan 9. doi: 10.1111/jdv.16187. [Epub ahead of print]Efficacy of tildrakizumab by patient demographic and disease characteristics across a phase 2b and 2 phase 3 trials in patients with moderate-to-severe chronic plaque psoriasis.Poulin Y, Ramon M, Rosoph L, Weisman J, Mendelsohn AM, Parno J, Rozzo SJ, Lee

Follicular Eruption With Folliculotropic Lymphocytic Infiltrates Associated With Iatrogenic Immunosuppression: Report and Study of 3 Cases, and Review of the Literature.Avitan-Hersh E, Dias-Polak D, Ramon M, Sahar D, Magen D, Pollack S, Bergman R.Am J Dermatopathol. 2019 Nov 26. [Epub ahead of print]

Enhanced Itch Intensity Is Associated with Less Efficient Descending Inhibition Processing for Itch But Not Pain Attenuation in Chronic Dermatology PatientsGranot M, Yakov S, Ramon M.Pain Med. 2019 Oct 23. pii: pnz263. doi: 10.1093/pm/pnz263. [Epub ahead of print]

Cutan Pathol. 2020 Feb;47(2):113-120. doi: 10.1111/cup.13588. Epub 2019 Oct 27

Follicular eruption with folliculotropic lymphocytic infiltrates associated with anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha therapy: Report and study of 3 cases.

Avitan-Hersh E1,2, Dias-Polak D1, Ramon M1, Zaaroura H1, Sahar D3, Bergman

Treatment of Plaque-Type Psoriasis With Oral CF101: Data from a Phase II/III Multicenter, Randomized, Controlled Trial.David M, Gospodinov DK, Gheorghe N, Mateev GS, Rusinova MV, Hristakieva E, Solovastru LG, Patel RV, Giurcaneanu C, Hitova MC, Purcaru AI, Horia B, Tsingov II, Yankova RK, Kadurina MI, Ramon M, Rotaru M, Simionescu O, Benea V, Demerdjieva ZV, Cosgarea MR, Morariu HS, Michael Z, Cristodor P, Nica C, Silverman MH, Bristol DR, Harpaz Z, Farbstein M, Cohen S, Fishman P.

J Drugs Dermatol. 2016 Aug 1;15(8):931-8.

 

 

Does infection play a role in the pathogenesis of granuloma annulare?

Avitan-Hersh E, Sprecher H, Ramon M, Bergman

J Am Acad Dermatol. 2013 Feb;68(2):342-3

 

 

J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol. 2012 Mar;26(3):361-7 Epub 2011 Apr 20.

 

Treatment of plaque-type psoriasis with oral CF101: data from an exploratory randomized phase 2 clinical trial.

 

David M1, Akerman L, Ziv M, Kadurina M, Gospodinov D, Pavlotsky F, Yankova R, Kouzeva V,  Ramon M, Silverman MH, Fishman P.

 

 

Psoriasis patients generate increased serum levels of autoantibodies to tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interferon-alpha.

Bergman R, Ramon M, Wildbaum G, Avitan-Hersh E, Mayer E, Shemer A, Karin N.

J Dermatol Sci. 2009 Dec;56(3):163-7. doi: 10.1016/j.jdermsci.2009.08.006. Epub 2009 Oct 2.

 

Isr Med Assoc J. 2008 Jun;10(6):413-4.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Efficacy of tildrakizumab by patient demographic and

disease characteristics across a phase 2b and 2 phase 3

trials in patients with moderate-to-severe chronic plaque

psoriasis

Y. Poulin, M. Ramon,L. Rosoph,J. Weisman,A.M. Mendelsohn,

J. Parno,,S.J. Rozzo,P. Lee

JEADV july2020

 

Catastrophizing thinking toward itch and pain in chronic itch patients

JEAD sept 2020

 

Title:

Abstract:

Prof. Yuval Ramot

Department of Dermatology, Hadassah Medical Center, Jerusalem, Israel

Bio:

Yuval Ramot, MD, MSc

Associate Professor of Dermatology and Venereology, Hadassah Medical Center, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, The Faculty of Medicine, Jerusalem, Israel

Yuval Ramot is an Associate Professor of Dermatology in the Hebrew University and is the director of the psoriasis and hidradenitis suppurativa clinics in Hadassah Medical Center. His research focuses on inflammatory skin conditions, genetic skin and hair diseases, and toxicology of the skin. He is a member of the European Hair Research Society and Israel Society of Dermatology and Venereology boards. In addition, he is part of the Editorial Board of Experimental Dermatology, Skin Health and Disease and JEADV Clinical Practice. He has co-authored more than 10 chapters in books and more than 180 articles in peer-reviewed journals.

.

Title:

Lecture 1:
Nail psoriasis and fungal infections

Abstract:

Abstract 1:

Yuval Ramot

The Faculty of Medicine, Hebrew University of Jerusalem and the Department of Dermatology, Hadassah Medical Center, Jerusalem, Israel

 

The connection between nail psoriasis and onychomycosis is still a matter of debate, and the relationship between these two entities is still under scrutiny. In psoriasis, the changes in the capillaries of the nail together with the defects in the nail plate, can lead to susceptibility to infections. Furthermore, onycholysis, a common feature of nail psoriasis, can result in a humid environment, that may enhance fungal proliferation. This, together with the use of immunosuppressive medications, can lead to increased vulnerability to fungal infection. In this talk, the incidence and pathogenesis of dermatophyte infection in nail psoriasis will be discussed.

Prof. Dimitris Rigopoulos

Professor of Dermatology-Venereology Chair of the 1st Department of Dermatology-VenereologyNational and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Medical School, Sygros Hospital
Greece

Bio:

Professor Rigopoulos graduated from the Medical School of the National and Kapodistrian University of Athens Greece. He performed his residency in Dermatology-Venereology at Sygros Hospital, he was trained in Lasers and Dermo-surgery at the Northwestern University of Chicago. He was elected as Lecturer at the National Kapodistrian University of Athens, Medical School, then as Assistant Professor, Associate Professor and finally as Full Professor of Dermatology.

He is Member of the European Academy of Dermatology, of the American Academy of Dermatology, of the American Dermatological Association , of the International Society of Dermatology.

He was the Past President of the Council for Nail Diseases (USA) and he is the President of the European Nail Society.

He is the President of the Hellenic Society of Dermatology and Venereology since 2010.

He has published 200 peer reviewed papers, he is the author of 10 books, 20 chapters in books and has participated in 30 clinical trials. He is invited speaker in many European and International Congresses and Meetings.

He is the founder and one of the two Editors of the Skin Appendage Disorders Medical Journal, Published by S. Karger AG, Basel, Switzerland.

Title:

Abstract:

Prof. Phoebe Rich

Oregon Health and Science University, and Oregon Dermatology and Research

Bio:

Title:

Abstract:

Prof. Adam I. Rubin

Associate Professor of Dermatology, Pediatrics, and Pathology and Laboratory Medicine at the Perelman School of MedicineUniversity of Pennsylvania
USA

Bio:

Adam I. Rubin, MD is an Associate Professor of Dermatology, Pediatrics, and Pathology and Laboratory Medicine at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. There he directs the adult and pediatric nail clinics, and practices at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, and the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Rubin specializes in nail disorders, nail surgery, and histopathology of the nail unit. Dr. Rubin is the lead editor for the 4th edition of Scher and Daniel’s Nails: Diagnosis, Therapy, Surgery, published in 2018. He is an author of the 3rd edition of the Atlas and Synopsis of Lever's Histopathology of the Skin, and an associate editor of the 11th edition of Lever's Histopathology of the Skin. At the Children’s Hospital of Philadephia he is the pediatric dermatopathologist, and a member of the largest pediatric dermatology group in the United States. He is an Associate Editor for the Journal of Cutaneous Pathology, where he focuses on nail pathology and pediatric dermatopathology. He is an Assistant Editor for the journal Dermatologic Surgery, where he focuses on nail surgery. Dr. Rubin is also an Assistant Section Editor for JAMA Dermatology. He serves on multiple other editorial boards including the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, The American Journal of Dermatopathology, Skin Appendage Disorders, and Dermatology Practical and Conceptual. Dr. Rubin is a current board member of the Council for Nail Disorders and The European Nail Society, and is a member of the Executive Committee of the International Society for Dermatopathology. Dr. Rubin is the current Secretary-Treasurer of the Council for Nail Disorders and a co-director of the annual European Nail Society Nail Histopathology Workshop.

Title:

Abstract:

Keep me updated

* Required