Speakers

Keynote Speakers

Prof. Michele De Palma

EPFL (École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne)

Miki De Palma graduated in Biology (1999) at the University of Torino, Italy, with a master thesis on the antiproliferative activities of type-I interferons in cancer cells. In 2004, he obtained a PhD Degree in Cell Biotechnologies from the University of Torino Medical School, where he studied the contribution of bone marrow-derived cells to tumor angiogenesis under the direction of gene therapy pioneer, Dr. Luigi Naldini. He performed his post-doctoral training at the Telethon Institute for Gene Therapy (TIGET) in Milan, to further characterize the pro-angiogenic functions of tumor-associated macrophages and develop gene transfer strategies for reprogramming them into anti-tumoral immune cells. In 2008, he was appointed group leader (with tenure since 2011) at the San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, and joined the ISREC Institute, at the EPFL School of Life Sciences, in 2012. He teaches cancer biology at EPFL and serves on the editorial/advisory boards of Science Translational Medicine (AAAS), Cell Reports (Cell press), BBA-Reviews on Cancer (section editor), Cancer Immunology Research (AACR), and Carcinogenesis. In his spare time, he enjoys travelling to sub-saharan Africa and writing boring articles and books on the taxonomy of the African fruit and flower chafers. Miki received two ERC grants, in 2009 and 2016.

https://www.epfl.ch/labs/depalma-lab/

Prof. Lewis Lanier

Director, Parker Institute of Cancer Immunotherapy, USA

Dr. Lewis L. Lanier is the chair of the Department of Microbiology and Immunology and the leader of the Cancer, Immunity, and Microenvironment Program at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) Comprehensive Cancer Center.

Dr. Lanier is an expert on natural killer (NK) cells, and is renowned for his contributions to the characterization of how NK cells recognize and deal with virus-infected tissues. He’s identified many of the receptors that activate and inhibit NK cells, and has shown how they can be activated against cancer cells. For his contributions, he received the 2002 William B. Coley Award for Distinguished Research in Basic and Tumor Immunology, and earned membership in the National Academy of Sciences. He continues to explore the mechanisms that enable NK cells to distinguish between healthy cells and infected or cancerous cells.

In addition to being a member of CRI’s Scientific Advisory Council, Dr. Lanier serves on the Postdoctoral Fellowship Review Committee.

https://cancer.ucsf.edu/research/programs/cancer-immunology-immunotherapy

Prof. Dana Pe'er

Chair, Computational and Systems Biology Program, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, USA

Dana Pe'er is currently the Chair and Professor in Computational and Systems Biology Program at Sloan Kettering Institute, and regarded as one of the leading researchers in computational systems biology. She was selected as a Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) Investigator in September, 2021. Previously, she was a professor at Columbia Department of Biological Sciences. Pe'er's research focuses on understanding the organization, function and evolution of molecular networks, particularly how genetic variations alter the regulatory network and how these genetic variations can cause cancer. Pe’er currently serves on the editorial board of the journal Cell. Pe'er has won several prestigious awards including a Burroughs Wellcome Fund Career Award, a NSF CAREER award and a Stand Up To Cancer Innovative Research Grant. She was awarded an NIH Director's New Innovator Award in 2007 in order to investigate how genetic variations can cause changes throughout the whole body which can lead to autoimmune disease and cancer. Pe'er was awarded a Packard Fellowship in Science and Engineering in 2009. She was awarded the ISCB Overton Prize in 2014 for her significant contribution to research, particularly in using computational methods to understand the organization and function of molecular networks in cells. She was selected as a Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) Investigator in September, 2021.

Prof. Carsten Watzl

Head of Immunology Department, Leibniz Research Centre for Working Environment, Germany

2011 Full Professor for Immunology at Leibniz Research Centre for Working Environment and Human Factors, Technical University Dortmund, Germany

2006 Extraordinary Professorship (apl. Prof.), University Heidelberg, Germany

2002-2011 Group Leader at the Institute for Immunology, University Heidelberg, Germany

2004 Habilitation in Immunology, Medical Faculty, University Heidelberg, Gemrmany

1998-2002 PostDoc (University Heidelberg, Germany and NIAID-NIH, USA)

1998 PhD in biology at University Heidelberg, Germany

https://www.ifado.de/immunology/staff/carsten-watzl/

Prof. Ronald N. Germain

Chief, Laboratory of Immune System Biology and the Lymphocyte Biology Section, NIH, USA

Dr. Ronald Germain is chief of the Lymphocyte Biology Section and Laboratory of Systems Biology at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, NIH. His research contributes to the understanding of how the immune system functions from the molecular level up to the level of the organism. He’s helped elucidate the expression, structure, and function of antigen-presenting proteins; the cell biology of antigen processing; and the molecular basis of T cell recognition. His research group is currently focused on two different approaches to unraveling the integrated function of the immune system: (1) using advanced imaging techniques to understand immune cell dynamics and the role of tissue micro-anatomy in host defense and (2) using systems methods to quantitatively understand immunity at multiple scales. Dr. Germain received his BS and MS from Brown University in 1970 and his MD and PhD from Harvard Medical School and Harvard University in 1976.

https://irp.nih.gov/pi/ronald-germain

Prof. Michel Nussenzweig

Zanvil A. Cohn and Ralph m. Steinman professor, investigator, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Senior physician, The Rockefeller University

Michel Nussenzweig is interested in the molecular aspects of the immune system’s innate and adaptive responses. Using an approach combining biochemistry, molecular biology, and genetics, Nussenzweig and his team focus on B lymphocytes and antibodies to HIV-1 in their work on adaptive immunity, while their studies of innate immunity focus on dendritic cells. Through their work they aim to achieve a detailed understanding of the molecular basis of antibody production and the pathway of human dendritic cell development and differentiation. The team’s findings may help improve the effectiveness of vaccines for pathogens and therapies to prevent or control auto-immunity.

https://www.rockefeller.edu/our-scientists/heads-of-laboratories/875-michel-c-nussenzweig/

Prof. Charles Serhan

Director, CETRI, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Head of the Department of Oral Medicine, Infection, and Immunity, Harvard Medical School, USA

Prof. Charles Nicholas Serhan, PhD, DSc is the Simon Gelman Professor of Anaesthesia (Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology) at Harvard Medical School and Professor of Oral Medicine, Infection and Immunity at Harvard School of Dental Medicine. He is Director of the Center for Experimental Therapeutics and Reperfusion Injury at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. In 1987, he joined the faculty at Harvard Medical School in 1987 and received an honorary degree from Harvard University (1996). He has received several awards including an NIH MERIT award (2000) and has delivered > 50 keynote and plenary lectures. Among these, 2008 William Harvey Outstanding Scientist Medal and AAAS Fellow in 2011. In 2010, he received the Society for Leukocyte Biology Bonazinga Award for outstanding research on leukocytes, The American College of Rheumatology Hench (Nobel Laureate) Award Lecture in 2011 and is a Mérieux 2013 Laureate. In 2016, he received the IUBMB Lecture Metal and the Ross Prize in Molecular Medicine. In 2017, he received the International Eicosanoid Research Foundation’s Lifetime Achievement Award and the American Society of Investigative Pathology (ASIP) 2018 Rous Whipple Award.

Dr. Serhan over 25 years of experience leading multidisciplinary research teams and led as Principle Investigator/Program Director Program (PI/PD) Project “Molecular Mechanisms in Leukocyte-Mediated Tissue Injury” (P01-DE13499), PI/PD for “Specialized Center for Oral Inflammation and Resolution” (P50-DE016191) and currently is the PI/PD of “Resolution Mechanisms in Acute Inflammation: Resolution Pharmacology” (P01-GM095467) a program project grant supported by NIH/NIGMS. Importantly, he is hands-on at the bench and has trained > 60 fellows and trainees that has successful careers in academic medicine and industry.

Current research in the Serhan laboratory focuses on structural elucidation of novel bioactive molecules that activate the resolution of inflammation. Our overall mission is “To identify novel mediators, pathways, and their cellular receptors and targets critical in promoting resolution of inflammation and reperfusion tissue injury and establish their relation to human disease.” Our ongoing studies focus on structural elucidation of novel molecules and pathways that are pro-resolving and endogenous anti-inflammatory chemical signals.

https://serhanlab.bwh.harvard.edu/

Prof. Michele De Palma

EPFL (École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne)

Miki De Palma graduated in Biology (1999) at the University of Torino, Italy, with a master thesis on the antiproliferative activities of type-I interferons in cancer cells. In 2004, he obtained a PhD Degree in Cell Biotechnologies from the University of Torino Medical School, where he studied the contribution of bone marrow-derived cells to tumor angiogenesis under the direction of gene therapy pioneer, Dr. Luigi Naldini. He performed his post-doctoral training at the Telethon Institute for Gene Therapy (TIGET) in Milan, to further characterize the pro-angiogenic functions of tumor-associated macrophages and develop gene transfer strategies for reprogramming them into anti-tumoral immune cells. In 2008, he was appointed group leader (with tenure since 2011) at the San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, and joined the ISREC Institute, at the EPFL School of Life Sciences, in 2012. He teaches cancer biology at EPFL and serves on the editorial/advisory boards of Science Translational Medicine (AAAS), Cell Reports (Cell press), BBA-Reviews on Cancer (section editor), Cancer Immunology Research (AACR), and Carcinogenesis. In his spare time, he enjoys travelling to sub-saharan Africa and writing boring articles and books on the taxonomy of the African fruit and flower chafers. Miki received two ERC grants, in 2009 and 2016.

https://www.epfl.ch/labs/depalma-lab/

Prof. Ronald N. Germain

Chief, Laboratory of Immune System Biology and the Lymphocyte Biology Section, NIH, USA

Dr. Ronald Germain is chief of the Lymphocyte Biology Section and Laboratory of Systems Biology at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, NIH. His research contributes to the understanding of how the immune system functions from the molecular level up to the level of the organism. He’s helped elucidate the expression, structure, and function of antigen-presenting proteins; the cell biology of antigen processing; and the molecular basis of T cell recognition. His research group is currently focused on two different approaches to unraveling the integrated function of the immune system: (1) using advanced imaging techniques to understand immune cell dynamics and the role of tissue micro-anatomy in host defense and (2) using systems methods to quantitatively understand immunity at multiple scales. Dr. Germain received his BS and MS from Brown University in 1970 and his MD and PhD from Harvard Medical School and Harvard University in 1976.

https://irp.nih.gov/pi/ronald-germain

Prof. Lewis Lanier

Director, Parker Institute of Cancer Immunotherapy, USA

Dr. Lewis L. Lanier is the chair of the Department of Microbiology and Immunology and the leader of the Cancer, Immunity, and Microenvironment Program at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) Comprehensive Cancer Center.

Dr. Lanier is an expert on natural killer (NK) cells, and is renowned for his contributions to the characterization of how NK cells recognize and deal with virus-infected tissues. He’s identified many of the receptors that activate and inhibit NK cells, and has shown how they can be activated against cancer cells. For his contributions, he received the 2002 William B. Coley Award for Distinguished Research in Basic and Tumor Immunology, and earned membership in the National Academy of Sciences. He continues to explore the mechanisms that enable NK cells to distinguish between healthy cells and infected or cancerous cells.

In addition to being a member of CRI’s Scientific Advisory Council, Dr. Lanier serves on the Postdoctoral Fellowship Review Committee.

https://cancer.ucsf.edu/research/programs/cancer-immunology-immunotherapy

Prof. Michel Nussenzweig

Zanvil A. Cohn and Ralph m. Steinman professor, investigator, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Senior physician, The Rockefeller University

Michel Nussenzweig is interested in the molecular aspects of the immune system’s innate and adaptive responses. Using an approach combining biochemistry, molecular biology, and genetics, Nussenzweig and his team focus on B lymphocytes and antibodies to HIV-1 in their work on adaptive immunity, while their studies of innate immunity focus on dendritic cells. Through their work they aim to achieve a detailed understanding of the molecular basis of antibody production and the pathway of human dendritic cell development and differentiation. The team’s findings may help improve the effectiveness of vaccines for pathogens and therapies to prevent or control auto-immunity.

https://www.rockefeller.edu/our-scientists/heads-of-laboratories/875-michel-c-nussenzweig/

Prof. Dana Pe'er

Chair, Computational and Systems Biology Program, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, USA

Dana Pe'er is currently the Chair and Professor in Computational and Systems Biology Program at Sloan Kettering Institute, and regarded as one of the leading researchers in computational systems biology. She was selected as a Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) Investigator in September, 2021. Previously, she was a professor at Columbia Department of Biological Sciences. Pe'er's research focuses on understanding the organization, function and evolution of molecular networks, particularly how genetic variations alter the regulatory network and how these genetic variations can cause cancer. Pe’er currently serves on the editorial board of the journal Cell. Pe'er has won several prestigious awards including a Burroughs Wellcome Fund Career Award, a NSF CAREER award and a Stand Up To Cancer Innovative Research Grant. She was awarded an NIH Director's New Innovator Award in 2007 in order to investigate how genetic variations can cause changes throughout the whole body which can lead to autoimmune disease and cancer. Pe'er was awarded a Packard Fellowship in Science and Engineering in 2009. She was awarded the ISCB Overton Prize in 2014 for her significant contribution to research, particularly in using computational methods to understand the organization and function of molecular networks in cells. She was selected as a Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) Investigator in September, 2021.

Prof. Charles Serhan

Director, CETRI, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Head of the Department of Oral Medicine, Infection, and Immunity, Harvard Medical School, USA

Prof. Charles Nicholas Serhan, PhD, DSc is the Simon Gelman Professor of Anaesthesia (Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology) at Harvard Medical School and Professor of Oral Medicine, Infection and Immunity at Harvard School of Dental Medicine. He is Director of the Center for Experimental Therapeutics and Reperfusion Injury at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. In 1987, he joined the faculty at Harvard Medical School in 1987 and received an honorary degree from Harvard University (1996). He has received several awards including an NIH MERIT award (2000) and has delivered > 50 keynote and plenary lectures. Among these, 2008 William Harvey Outstanding Scientist Medal and AAAS Fellow in 2011. In 2010, he received the Society for Leukocyte Biology Bonazinga Award for outstanding research on leukocytes, The American College of Rheumatology Hench (Nobel Laureate) Award Lecture in 2011 and is a Mérieux 2013 Laureate. In 2016, he received the IUBMB Lecture Metal and the Ross Prize in Molecular Medicine. In 2017, he received the International Eicosanoid Research Foundation’s Lifetime Achievement Award and the American Society of Investigative Pathology (ASIP) 2018 Rous Whipple Award.

Dr. Serhan over 25 years of experience leading multidisciplinary research teams and led as Principle Investigator/Program Director Program (PI/PD) Project “Molecular Mechanisms in Leukocyte-Mediated Tissue Injury” (P01-DE13499), PI/PD for “Specialized Center for Oral Inflammation and Resolution” (P50-DE016191) and currently is the PI/PD of “Resolution Mechanisms in Acute Inflammation: Resolution Pharmacology” (P01-GM095467) a program project grant supported by NIH/NIGMS. Importantly, he is hands-on at the bench and has trained > 60 fellows and trainees that has successful careers in academic medicine and industry.

Current research in the Serhan laboratory focuses on structural elucidation of novel bioactive molecules that activate the resolution of inflammation. Our overall mission is “To identify novel mediators, pathways, and their cellular receptors and targets critical in promoting resolution of inflammation and reperfusion tissue injury and establish their relation to human disease.” Our ongoing studies focus on structural elucidation of novel molecules and pathways that are pro-resolving and endogenous anti-inflammatory chemical signals.

https://serhanlab.bwh.harvard.edu/

Prof. Carsten Watzl

Head of Immunology Department, Leibniz Research Centre for Working Environment, Germany

2011 Full Professor for Immunology at Leibniz Research Centre for Working Environment and Human Factors, Technical University Dortmund, Germany

2006 Extraordinary Professorship (apl. Prof.), University Heidelberg, Germany

2002-2011 Group Leader at the Institute for Immunology, University Heidelberg, Germany

2004 Habilitation in Immunology, Medical Faculty, University Heidelberg, Gemrmany

1998-2002 PostDoc (University Heidelberg, Germany and NIAID-NIH, USA)

1998 PhD in biology at University Heidelberg, Germany

https://www.ifado.de/immunology/staff/carsten-watzl/

Invited Speakers

Ronen Alon

The Weizmann Institute of Science

Prof. Ronen Alon earned his PhD in biophysics at the Weizmann Institute of Science in 1993. He was a research fellow at Harvard Medical School and in 1996 joined the Weizmann Institute Department of Immunology. He is an EMBO member since 2012. Prof. Alon investigates how white blood cells exit blood vessels at sites of inflammation and the functions of cell adhesion molecules on dendritic cell subsets in lymphocyte activation and differentiation during infection and cancer expansion. His lab also studies how metastatic tumor cells survive inside lung blood vessels and how they are attacked by innate and adaptive leukocytes inside this vasculature.

Nadir Arber

Sheba Medical Center

Roi Avraham

Weizmann Institute of Science

Yotam Bar-On

Technion - Israel Institute of Technology

I have joined Prof. Michel Nussenzweig’s lab at the Rockefeller University in New York City as an EMBO fellow in 2016. In my postdoctoral studies I have focused on antibody responses to HIV-1. During my postdoc I demonstrated that anti-HIV-1 antibodies alter the course of HIV-1 infection and  that treatment with a combination of broadly neutralizing antibodies that target the HIV-1 Envelope (Env) protein can lead to sustained HIV-1. In March 2020, I was recruited by the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology as a junior faculty member (assistant professor). In my newly established lab, I continue to focus on virus-host interaction with a special emphasis on HIV-1 latency and respiratory viruses. 

Mira Barda-Saad

Bar Ilan University

Bar Ilan University

Prof. Mira Barda-Saad, a returning scientist from the National Cancer Institute at NIH in Maryland, is a Senior Lecturer at the Mina and Everard Goodman Faculty of Life Sciences. Barda-Saad is currently examining the molecular signaling mechanisms controlling immune cell response with the primary goal of relating this knowledge to pathophysiological conditions of the immune system. She believes that understanding the dynamic behavior of signaling and cytoskeletal molecules that control immune cell activation is essential for identification of targets relevant for the treatment of cancer, autoimmune diseases and immunodeficiencies.

Michael Berger

The Lautenberg Center for Immunology and Cancer Research

Cyrille Cohen

Bar Ilan University

Moshe Elkabets

Ben Gurion University

Moshe received his Ph.D degree from the Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU) under the supervision of Prof. Ronnie Apte and Prof. Shraga Segal. Moshe awarded with a pre-doctoral fellowship and spent a year at Pasteur institute in the lab of Prof. James Di Santo. Moshe then conducted six years of postdoctoral fellowship at Harvard Medical School in the lab of Prof. Sandra McAllister and at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in Dr. Jose Baselga laboratory. Prof. Elkabets joined BGU in October 2015. Moshe's research focuses primarily on identifying new therapies for head and neck cancer.

Neta Erez

Tel Aviv University

Prof. Erez is studying the biology of tumor metastasis, focusing on the metastatic microenvironment, cancer-related inflammation and the role of stromal and immune cells in facilitating the early and late stages of metastasis. The main goal of her research is to characterize key molecular pathways in the communication between tumor cells and their microenvironment that can be targeted by novel therapeutics.


Prof. Erez began her academic career at the Weizmann Institute of Science, where she performed her PhD in molecular cell biology with Prof. Varda Rotter.
Supported by a fellowship from the Cancer Research Institute (CRI), Prof. Erez carried out her postdoctoral research in the laboratory of Prof. Doug Hanahan at UCSF (2005-2010). Prof. Erez is currently a board member of the Metastasis Research Society and Vice president of the Israeli Society for Cancer Research.

Tsvee Granot

The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Zvi Granot, Ph.D.
Professor, Dept. of Developmental Biology and Cancer Research, Faculty of Medicine, Hebrew University

Zvi Granot did his Ph.D. in biochemistry at the Hebrew University. His postdoctoral studies in Dr. Robert Benezra’s lab at MSKCC highlighted a novel role for neutrophils is cancer. In August of 2012 he joined the faculty of medicine as an assistant professor. Since then, the function of neutrophils in the context of cancer has become Prof. Granot’s main focus. Research in his lab aims at gaining in-depth insight into the mechanism that regulate neutrophil function in cancer, inflammation and infection. Prof. Granot is CSO of Immunyx Pharma, a drug development company focused on modulating neutrophil function for therapeutical purposes

Shalev Itzkovitz

Weizmann Institute of Science

Shalev Itzkovitz uses tools from Systems Biology to study design principles of tissue organization, focusing on the key metabolic tissues – the liver, intestine and pancreas. He obtained his BSc in Physics and Mathematics at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem, MSc in Electrical Engineering at the Technion and PhD in Systems Biology at the Weizmann Institute. Following a postdoc fellowship at MIT, Dr. Itzkovitz joined the Department of Molecular Cell Biology at the Weizmann Institute in 2012 and obtained tenure in 2017. He was selected as an HHMI International Research Scholar and a Vallee Young Investigator in 2017.

Nathan Karin

Technion - Israel Institute of Technology

Nathan Karin is a professor of immunology. His laboratory focuses on the role of chemokines in directing the biological function of effector and regulatory T cells in the interface between cancer and autoimmunity: Among the key discoveries of the lab are The discovery of the alpha4 beta 1 integrins (VLA-4) as the drivers of effector T cells and monocytic migration to the inflamed central nervous system (CNS) (Nature 1992), a novel antibody-based regulatory mechanism (immunity 2003), the differential role of CXCR3 ligand in directing the biological function of effector and T-regulatory 1 cells (JCI 2014) and more recently the identification of CCR8+ regulatory T cells as master drivers of immune regulation (PNAS 2017).

Tsvee Lapidot

Weizmann Institute of Science

Ph.D: allogeneic T cell depleted bone marrow transplantation (1990 Weizmann Institute  with Yair Reisner). 
Post Doc: with John Dick (1994), Toronto Canada, functional preclinical models for normal human blood forming stem cells in transplanted immune deficient SCID mice (Science 1992) and human Leukemia initiating stem cells in transplanted NOD/SCID mice (Nature 1994).  
Weizmann Institute:  research focused on regulation of the bone marrow reservoir, including the CXCR4/CXL12 axis in human stem cell homing and engraftment (Science 1999), the blood bone marrow endothelial barrier (Nature 2016) circadian rhythms (CSC 2018)
and neutrophils lactated during acute inflammation (Nature Com. 2020).

Michal Lotem

Hadassah Hebrew University Medical Center

Asaf Madi

Tel Aviv University

Michal Mandelboim

Sheba Medical Center

Michal Mark

Weizmann Institute of Science

I did my MSc and Ph.D. in the lab of Prof. Nir Friedman, studying the T cells receptor repertoire in several mice models. Sadly, Nir died after a long battle with illness without being able to complete this work. We have tried to complete the presented study in the spirit in which it was undertaken, but we are conscious that we fall far short of the insight and clarity of Nir’s remarkable intellect.

Dror Mevorach

The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Ariel Munitz

Tel Aviv University

Prof. Ariel Munitz is Professor of Immunology and The Faculty of Medicine of the Tel Aviv University. His laboratory is focused on elucidating cellular and molecular mechanisms that are involved in mucosal inflammation and cancer with specific interest in the roles of eosinophils. Studies from his laboratory established key roles for eosinophils in lung metastasis and colorectal cancer. Prof. Munitz’s research is supported by the US-Israel Bi-national Science Foundation, the Israel Science Foundation, The Israel Cancer Research Foundation, The Israel Cancer Association, The Israel Ministry of Health, the Emerson Foundation and the European Union. Recently, his laboratory received recognition as a Center of Excellence by the World Allergy Organization.

Angel Porgador

Ben Gurion University

Yoram Reiter

Technion - Israel Institute of Technology

Professor Yoram Reiter, Laboratory of Molecular Immunology, Sebba chair in Sciences. Director of the Lokey interdisciplinary Center for Life Sciences and Engineering.

Reiter is a Professor and the head of the Laboratory of Molecular Immunology and Cancer Immunotherapy at the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology. His research involves basic and translational research in antibody and cell engineering for the design of novel immunotherapies. Reiter is a graduate of the Weizmann Institute of Science and post doc fellow at the NCI, NIH. He is at the Technion faculty since 1998. He has more than 25 years of experience in molecular immunology, antibody and cell engineering related to cancer immunotherapy. He is pioneer in the field of TCR mimicking antibodies. This work lead to the creation of Applied Immune Technologies developing next generation antibody-based immunotherapies. AIT was acquired and merged into Adicet Bio Inc (NASDAQ:ACET) which recently presented highly promising clinical data in NHL with CAR-engineered gamma-delta1 T cells. Reiter's lab combines basic and translational research related to T cell biology, effector T cells functions, design of optimal CARs and well as multiple project on antibody engineering and T cell engagers. Reiter was the dean of the faculty of Biology (twice) and is director of an institutional interdisciplinary research. He published >120 papers, patents, review articles in the fields of molecular immunology and antibody engineering.

Noga Ron Harel

Technion - Israel Institute of Technology

Yardena Samuels

Weizmann Institute of Science

Idit Shachar

The Weizmann Institute of Science

Shai Shen-Orr

Technion - Israel Institute of Technology

Adi Stern

Tel Aviv University

Ziv Shulman

The Weizmann Institute of Science

Boaz Tirosh

The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Prof. Boaz Tirosh is a full professor of the Hebrew University and currently serves as the head of the School of Pharmacy of the Hebrew University.

His lab is interested in stress signaling as a regulator of cell function and response to drug therapy. A major interest of the lab is the unfolded protein response and the mTOR pathway.

Prof. Tirosh published more than 70 peer-reviewed scientific papers and is the inventor of several technologies in the field of antibody production.

Elena Voronov

Ben-Gurion University of the Negev

Elena Voronov received her MD degree in 1980 from the Samara Medical School, Samara, Russia.  In 1988, Dr. Voronov was awarded her PhD by The State Institute for Continuing Education for Physicians, Leningrad, Russia. The title of her thesis was: "Immunology of viral hepatitis: Prognostic role of immune-complexes and functional activity of leukocytes".  Dr. Voronov worked as a physician and an Assistant Professor in the Medical Institute in Samara. In 1990, Dr. Voronov and her family immigrated to Israel and began working in Professor Apte’s lab in the Immunology Department of Ben Gurion University of the Negev School of Medicine, in Beer Sheva, Israel. During these years, Dr. Voronov has been investigating the role of Interleukin-1 family molecules and their role in inflammation and cancer.

Debbie Yablonski

Technion - Israel Institute of Technology

Dvir Aran

Technion - Israel Institute of Technology

Orly Avni

Bar Ilan University

Michal Baniyash

The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Prof. Shai Bel

Bar Ilan University

The Bel lab studies the mechanisms which allow the host to maintain a mutualistic relationship with its gut microbiota and why this relationship breaks down during inflammatory bowel diseases.

Adit Ben-Baruch

Tel Aviv University

Yehudit Bergman

The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Sol Efroni

Bar Ilan University

Sol Efroni is the head of the systems biomedicine lab at Bar-Ilan University. Sol did his BSc in physics at Tel-Aviv University, his MA at the Hebrew University in Cognitive Sciences and his PhD at the Weizmann Institute in Immunology and in Computer Science. He then continued for a postdoc at the NCI, where he worked on cancer genomics. Sol started his own group at the Faculty of Life Sciences in 2009.

Ayelet Erez

Weizmann Institute of Science

Ayelet Erez studied medicine at the Technion Institute in Haifa, did her Paediatric Residency at Sheba Hospital, and completed a Ph.D. in Cancer Genetics at Tel Aviv University. In 2012, following training in clinical genetics and a postdoctoral fellowship at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas, Ayelet returned to Israel to the Weizmann Institute of Science, where she is currently an Associate Professor. Ayelet volunteers weekly at the oncogenetic clinic at Schneider Hospital she helped establish, where she sees children with a suspected genetic predisposition to cancer.  Ayelet’s research focuses on cancer genetic and metabolism for translational relevance.

Naama Geva-Zatorsky

Technion - Israel Institute of Technology

Nano Area: Nano Biotechnology & Nanomedicine

Faculty: Medicine

Ph.D.: System biology, Weizmann Institute of Science, 2012

M.Sc.: System biology, Weizmann Institute of Science, 2005

B.Sc.: Double major in Biology and Chemistry, Tel-Aviv University, 2002

Main Nano Field: Cellular and molecular level utilizing our experience in microbiology and immune cell repertoire analysis, in addition to our recent novel developments in live imaging of anaerobic gut bacteria

Research interests: In my newly established lab at the Technion, we are applying Systems-Biology thinking strategies together with Microbiology and Immunology approaches to study the mechanistic interactions of the gut microbiota with the mammalian host physiology at health and disease states. The gut microbiota has been shown to be important in many types of diseases. We view it as a treasure trove for therapeutics to improve human health.

 

Tomer Hertz

Ben Gurion University

Steffen Jung

The Weizmann Institute of Science

Steffen Jung performed his Ph.D. under the guidance of Andreas Radbruch, University of Cologne, defining cis-acting control elements of immunoglobulin class switch recombination. In 1993, Steffen joined the Lautenberg Center (Hebrew University, Jerusalem) and in 1997, the Skirball Institute for Molecular Pathogenesis, (New York). His postdoctoral studies involved the generation of CX3CR1gfp reporter mice and study monocyte subsets. Furthermore, he developed a diphtheria toxin receptor (DTR)-based cell ablation strategy to investigate dendritic cells. In 2002, Steffen joined the Weizmann Institute. Current work focuses on the ontogeny and differential functions of monocytes and macrophages in health and disease context.

Carmit Levy

Tel Aviv University

My research spams around melanoma development, from the very primary stage to metastases, melanocyte function, skin physiology and UVB exposure. I have established my lab, following post-doc at Harvard Medical School, in 2011 at Tel Aviv University. My laboratory has made several fundamental discoveries. We discovered novel factors in the tumor microenvironment that drive melanoma metastasis independent of mutation acquisition (Molecular Cell 2015, Nature Cell Biology 2016 and Science Signaling 2019). Using computational tools, we discovered the regulation of miRNA enhancers’ methylation (Genome Research 2016 and Nature Communications 2019) and created a decision tree in melanoma prognostication (Oncogene 2021).

Yoram Louzoun

Bar Ilan University

Prof. Yoram Louzoun has studied mathematics and physics, then continued to brain research in his Ph.D. and from there to immunology in his post doc. He now heads a laboratory composed of mathematicians, Life scientists, Computer scientists and physicists involved in multiple domains of computational biology, machine learning, stochastic processes and graph theory.  

His main contributions in immunology are novel methods to understand and predict the relation between peptides, MHC and TCR and their impact on T cell repertoires,  and multiple studies in HLA population genetics, as well

Kobi Maman

Bar Ilan University

Ofer Mandelboim

The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Gal Markel

Tel Aviv University

Dinorah Friedmann-Morvinski

Tel Aviv University

Prof. Dinorah Friedmann-Morvinski is an Assistant Professor at the School of Neurobiology, Biochemistry and Biophysics at the George S. Wise Faculty of Life Science and the Sagol School of Neuroscience at Tel Aviv University. Her research focuses on glioblastoma, one of the most heterogeneous and aggressive human brain tumors. Her lab seeks to understand how tumor cells change their differentiation state, also referred to as tumor plasticity and the role of the tumor microenvironment in this process. She believes that understanding these mechanisms and interactions will facilitate the development of novel strategies (e.g. nanomedicine and immunotherapy) to attack brain tumors.

Eli Pikarsky

The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Miki Rahat

Director, Research Laboratories and Immunotherapy Lab, Carmel Medical Center

I study the multifunctional protein EMMPRIN/CD147 in the context of malignancy and autoimmune diseases. As a mediator of epithelial cells-macrophage interactions, it is involved in angiogenesis, EMT and metastasis. Two approaches targeting a specific epitope in the protein were developed, one using an active peptide and the other using an antibody. The two approaches inhibited tumor progression and metastasis. I now study the efficacy and mechanisms of action of these vaccinations, focusing on their ability to prevent the metastatic outbreak. Additionally, I investigate the pro-angiogenic role of EMMPRIN in autoimmune diseases (e.g., RA, PsA, and T2DM). 

Asya Rolls

Technion - Israel Institute of Technology

Benyamin Rosental

Ben Gurion University

PROFESSIONAL PREPARATION:
Ben-Gurion University, Israel, Life Sciences.       
B.Sc., 2007
Ben-Gurion University, Israel, Microbiology and Immunology.               M.Med.Sc., 2010
Ben-Gurion University, Israel, Immunology.                  
Ph.D., 2013
Stanford University, CA, USA, Stem Cells and Comparative Immunology.  Postdoc., 2018
 
Head of Comparative Immunology and Stem Cells Transplantation Laboratory
Our laboratory research is focusing on tissue acceptance by the immune system, and stem cell transplantation. Our research is unique since we are working with non-classical model organisms to answer basic questions in immunology, for translating our findings to medical research.

Ronit Satchi-Fainaro

Tel Aviv University

Prof. Ronit Satchi-Fainaro (Ph.D.) is a Full Professor at Tel Aviv University, where she is head of the Cancer Research & Nanomedicine Laboratory, Director of Tel Aviv University Cancer Biology Research Center, Director of the TAU Kahn 3D BioPrinting Initiative, and holds the Lion Chair in Nanosciences and Nanotechnologies. She serves on the BoD of Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd. and the BoG of TAU, and is a member of the SAB of several Innovation Centers, Universities, Hospitals, Fellowships Committees, VCs, and editorial boards of scientific journals.

Her multidisciplinary research laboratory focuses on basic research elucidating the mechanisms underlying the switch from cancer dormancy leading to the discovery of new molecular targets to interrupt tumor-host interactions. She has published more than 130 manuscripts, 13 book chapters, edited two books, is named inventor on 60 patents, some of which were licensed to Pharmaceutical and Biotech companies. She founded two spin-off companies and is actively engaged in translational research with several industry partners and in science outreach.

Tal Shay

Ben Gurion University

Eilon Sherman

The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Noam Stern-Ginossar

Weizmann Institute of Science

Ran Taube

Ben Gurion University

Education
Tel Aviv University, TLV, Israel B.Sc. 1986 Life Sciences
Tel Aviv University, TLV, Israel M.Sc. 1992 Microbiology
Tel Aviv University, TLV, Israel Ph.D. 1998 Virology
University of California at San Francisco Post Doc. 1999-2002 Virology
Harvard Medical School –Dana Farber Cancer Institute Post Doc. 2004-2007 Virology 
 
Employment
2008-2015  -   Lecturer  -  Ben Gurion University of the Negev
2015-2020  -  Assistance professor - Ben Gurion University of the Negev
2020 - Associate Professor
 
We are currently focusing to identify novel factors that modulate HIV gene expression and promote viral latency. We are directing our efforts on the role of non-coding RNAs, in particular long ncRNA, and their role in establishing HIV latency. We apply our knowledge on newly identified lncRNAs and their role in promoting human malignancies. As part of our work we are conducting extensive work in different cell lines, as well as primary cells of various origins that support HIV replication. We also have experience in performing in vitro analysis of HIV replication, including purification of reverse transcriptase form bacteria and analysis of RT activity.

Chen Varol

Tel Aviv University

Chen Varol (PhD) is the director of the Research Center for Digestive Tract & Liver Diseases, at Tel-Aviv Sourasky Medical Center. He is also a Senior lecturer at the Department of Clinical Microbiology & Immunology, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv Israel.

Dr. Varol is an Immunologist, who strives to decipher the involvement of phagocytic innate immune cells in diseases of the digestive tract and metabolic syndrome. Our studies had major contribution to the current comprehension of gut and liver macrophage ontogeny and functional heterogeneity. We are in uncovering immunoregulatory pathways that mediate the pathological versus restorative activity of these cells.

Gur Yaari

Bar Ilan University

Ronen Alon

The Weizmann Institute of Science

Prof. Ronen Alon earned his PhD in biophysics at the Weizmann Institute of Science in 1993. He was a research fellow at Harvard Medical School and in 1996 joined the Weizmann Institute Department of Immunology. He is an EMBO member since 2012. Prof. Alon investigates how white blood cells exit blood vessels at sites of inflammation and the functions of cell adhesion molecules on dendritic cell subsets in lymphocyte activation and differentiation during infection and cancer expansion. His lab also studies how metastatic tumor cells survive inside lung blood vessels and how they are attacked by innate and adaptive leukocytes inside this vasculature.

Dvir Aran

Technion - Israel Institute of Technology

Nadir Arber

Sheba Medical Center

Orly Avni

Bar Ilan University

Roi Avraham

Weizmann Institute of Science

Michal Baniyash

The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Yotam Bar-On

Technion - Israel Institute of Technology

I have joined Prof. Michel Nussenzweig’s lab at the Rockefeller University in New York City as an EMBO fellow in 2016. In my postdoctoral studies I have focused on antibody responses to HIV-1. During my postdoc I demonstrated that anti-HIV-1 antibodies alter the course of HIV-1 infection and  that treatment with a combination of broadly neutralizing antibodies that target the HIV-1 Envelope (Env) protein can lead to sustained HIV-1. In March 2020, I was recruited by the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology as a junior faculty member (assistant professor). In my newly established lab, I continue to focus on virus-host interaction with a special emphasis on HIV-1 latency and respiratory viruses. 

Prof. Shai Bel

Bar Ilan University

The Bel lab studies the mechanisms which allow the host to maintain a mutualistic relationship with its gut microbiota and why this relationship breaks down during inflammatory bowel diseases.

Mira Barda-Saad

Bar Ilan University

Bar Ilan University

Prof. Mira Barda-Saad, a returning scientist from the National Cancer Institute at NIH in Maryland, is a Senior Lecturer at the Mina and Everard Goodman Faculty of Life Sciences. Barda-Saad is currently examining the molecular signaling mechanisms controlling immune cell response with the primary goal of relating this knowledge to pathophysiological conditions of the immune system. She believes that understanding the dynamic behavior of signaling and cytoskeletal molecules that control immune cell activation is essential for identification of targets relevant for the treatment of cancer, autoimmune diseases and immunodeficiencies.

Adit Ben-Baruch

Tel Aviv University

Michael Berger

The Lautenberg Center for Immunology and Cancer Research

Yehudit Bergman

The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Cyrille Cohen

Bar Ilan University

Sol Efroni

Bar Ilan University

Sol Efroni is the head of the systems biomedicine lab at Bar-Ilan University. Sol did his BSc in physics at Tel-Aviv University, his MA at the Hebrew University in Cognitive Sciences and his PhD at the Weizmann Institute in Immunology and in Computer Science. He then continued for a postdoc at the NCI, where he worked on cancer genomics. Sol started his own group at the Faculty of Life Sciences in 2009.

Moshe Elkabets

Ben Gurion University

Moshe received his Ph.D degree from the Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU) under the supervision of Prof. Ronnie Apte and Prof. Shraga Segal. Moshe awarded with a pre-doctoral fellowship and spent a year at Pasteur institute in the lab of Prof. James Di Santo. Moshe then conducted six years of postdoctoral fellowship at Harvard Medical School in the lab of Prof. Sandra McAllister and at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in Dr. Jose Baselga laboratory. Prof. Elkabets joined BGU in October 2015. Moshe's research focuses primarily on identifying new therapies for head and neck cancer.

Ayelet Erez

Weizmann Institute of Science

Ayelet Erez studied medicine at the Technion Institute in Haifa, did her Paediatric Residency at Sheba Hospital, and completed a Ph.D. in Cancer Genetics at Tel Aviv University. In 2012, following training in clinical genetics and a postdoctoral fellowship at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas, Ayelet returned to Israel to the Weizmann Institute of Science, where she is currently an Associate Professor. Ayelet volunteers weekly at the oncogenetic clinic at Schneider Hospital she helped establish, where she sees children with a suspected genetic predisposition to cancer.  Ayelet’s research focuses on cancer genetic and metabolism for translational relevance.

Neta Erez

Tel Aviv University

Prof. Erez is studying the biology of tumor metastasis, focusing on the metastatic microenvironment, cancer-related inflammation and the role of stromal and immune cells in facilitating the early and late stages of metastasis. The main goal of her research is to characterize key molecular pathways in the communication between tumor cells and their microenvironment that can be targeted by novel therapeutics.


Prof. Erez began her academic career at the Weizmann Institute of Science, where she performed her PhD in molecular cell biology with Prof. Varda Rotter.
Supported by a fellowship from the Cancer Research Institute (CRI), Prof. Erez carried out her postdoctoral research in the laboratory of Prof. Doug Hanahan at UCSF (2005-2010). Prof. Erez is currently a board member of the Metastasis Research Society and Vice president of the Israeli Society for Cancer Research.

Naama Geva-Zatorsky

Technion - Israel Institute of Technology

Nano Area: Nano Biotechnology & Nanomedicine

Faculty: Medicine

Ph.D.: System biology, Weizmann Institute of Science, 2012

M.Sc.: System biology, Weizmann Institute of Science, 2005

B.Sc.: Double major in Biology and Chemistry, Tel-Aviv University, 2002

Main Nano Field: Cellular and molecular level utilizing our experience in microbiology and immune cell repertoire analysis, in addition to our recent novel developments in live imaging of anaerobic gut bacteria

Research interests: In my newly established lab at the Technion, we are applying Systems-Biology thinking strategies together with Microbiology and Immunology approaches to study the mechanistic interactions of the gut microbiota with the mammalian host physiology at health and disease states. The gut microbiota has been shown to be important in many types of diseases. We view it as a treasure trove for therapeutics to improve human health.

 

Tsvee Granot

The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Zvi Granot, Ph.D.
Professor, Dept. of Developmental Biology and Cancer Research, Faculty of Medicine, Hebrew University

Zvi Granot did his Ph.D. in biochemistry at the Hebrew University. His postdoctoral studies in Dr. Robert Benezra’s lab at MSKCC highlighted a novel role for neutrophils is cancer. In August of 2012 he joined the faculty of medicine as an assistant professor. Since then, the function of neutrophils in the context of cancer has become Prof. Granot’s main focus. Research in his lab aims at gaining in-depth insight into the mechanism that regulate neutrophil function in cancer, inflammation and infection. Prof. Granot is CSO of Immunyx Pharma, a drug development company focused on modulating neutrophil function for therapeutical purposes

Tomer Hertz

Ben Gurion University

Shalev Itzkovitz

Weizmann Institute of Science

Shalev Itzkovitz uses tools from Systems Biology to study design principles of tissue organization, focusing on the key metabolic tissues – the liver, intestine and pancreas. He obtained his BSc in Physics and Mathematics at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem, MSc in Electrical Engineering at the Technion and PhD in Systems Biology at the Weizmann Institute. Following a postdoc fellowship at MIT, Dr. Itzkovitz joined the Department of Molecular Cell Biology at the Weizmann Institute in 2012 and obtained tenure in 2017. He was selected as an HHMI International Research Scholar and a Vallee Young Investigator in 2017.

Steffen Jung

The Weizmann Institute of Science

Steffen Jung performed his Ph.D. under the guidance of Andreas Radbruch, University of Cologne, defining cis-acting control elements of immunoglobulin class switch recombination. In 1993, Steffen joined the Lautenberg Center (Hebrew University, Jerusalem) and in 1997, the Skirball Institute for Molecular Pathogenesis, (New York). His postdoctoral studies involved the generation of CX3CR1gfp reporter mice and study monocyte subsets. Furthermore, he developed a diphtheria toxin receptor (DTR)-based cell ablation strategy to investigate dendritic cells. In 2002, Steffen joined the Weizmann Institute. Current work focuses on the ontogeny and differential functions of monocytes and macrophages in health and disease context.

Nathan Karin

Technion - Israel Institute of Technology

Nathan Karin is a professor of immunology. His laboratory focuses on the role of chemokines in directing the biological function of effector and regulatory T cells in the interface between cancer and autoimmunity: Among the key discoveries of the lab are The discovery of the alpha4 beta 1 integrins (VLA-4) as the drivers of effector T cells and monocytic migration to the inflamed central nervous system (CNS) (Nature 1992), a novel antibody-based regulatory mechanism (immunity 2003), the differential role of CXCR3 ligand in directing the biological function of effector and T-regulatory 1 cells (JCI 2014) and more recently the identification of CCR8+ regulatory T cells as master drivers of immune regulation (PNAS 2017).

Tsvee Lapidot

Weizmann Institute of Science

Ph.D: allogeneic T cell depleted bone marrow transplantation (1990 Weizmann Institute  with Yair Reisner). 
Post Doc: with John Dick (1994), Toronto Canada, functional preclinical models for normal human blood forming stem cells in transplanted immune deficient SCID mice (Science 1992) and human Leukemia initiating stem cells in transplanted NOD/SCID mice (Nature 1994).  
Weizmann Institute:  research focused on regulation of the bone marrow reservoir, including the CXCR4/CXL12 axis in human stem cell homing and engraftment (Science 1999), the blood bone marrow endothelial barrier (Nature 2016) circadian rhythms (CSC 2018)
and neutrophils lactated during acute inflammation (Nature Com. 2020).

Carmit Levy

Tel Aviv University

My research spams around melanoma development, from the very primary stage to metastases, melanocyte function, skin physiology and UVB exposure. I have established my lab, following post-doc at Harvard Medical School, in 2011 at Tel Aviv University. My laboratory has made several fundamental discoveries. We discovered novel factors in the tumor microenvironment that drive melanoma metastasis independent of mutation acquisition (Molecular Cell 2015, Nature Cell Biology 2016 and Science Signaling 2019). Using computational tools, we discovered the regulation of miRNA enhancers’ methylation (Genome Research 2016 and Nature Communications 2019) and created a decision tree in melanoma prognostication (Oncogene 2021).

Michal Lotem

Hadassah Hebrew University Medical Center

Yoram Louzoun

Bar Ilan University

Prof. Yoram Louzoun has studied mathematics and physics, then continued to brain research in his Ph.D. and from there to immunology in his post doc. He now heads a laboratory composed of mathematicians, Life scientists, Computer scientists and physicists involved in multiple domains of computational biology, machine learning, stochastic processes and graph theory.  

His main contributions in immunology are novel methods to understand and predict the relation between peptides, MHC and TCR and their impact on T cell repertoires,  and multiple studies in HLA population genetics, as well

Asaf Madi

Tel Aviv University

Kobi Maman

Bar Ilan University

Michal Mandelboim

Sheba Medical Center

Ofer Mandelboim

The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Michal Mark

Weizmann Institute of Science

I did my MSc and Ph.D. in the lab of Prof. Nir Friedman, studying the T cells receptor repertoire in several mice models. Sadly, Nir died after a long battle with illness without being able to complete this work. We have tried to complete the presented study in the spirit in which it was undertaken, but we are conscious that we fall far short of the insight and clarity of Nir’s remarkable intellect.

Gal Markel

Tel Aviv University

Dror Mevorach

The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Dinorah Friedmann-Morvinski

Tel Aviv University

Prof. Dinorah Friedmann-Morvinski is an Assistant Professor at the School of Neurobiology, Biochemistry and Biophysics at the George S. Wise Faculty of Life Science and the Sagol School of Neuroscience at Tel Aviv University. Her research focuses on glioblastoma, one of the most heterogeneous and aggressive human brain tumors. Her lab seeks to understand how tumor cells change their differentiation state, also referred to as tumor plasticity and the role of the tumor microenvironment in this process. She believes that understanding these mechanisms and interactions will facilitate the development of novel strategies (e.g. nanomedicine and immunotherapy) to attack brain tumors.

Ariel Munitz

Tel Aviv University

Prof. Ariel Munitz is Professor of Immunology and The Faculty of Medicine of the Tel Aviv University. His laboratory is focused on elucidating cellular and molecular mechanisms that are involved in mucosal inflammation and cancer with specific interest in the roles of eosinophils. Studies from his laboratory established key roles for eosinophils in lung metastasis and colorectal cancer. Prof. Munitz’s research is supported by the US-Israel Bi-national Science Foundation, the Israel Science Foundation, The Israel Cancer Research Foundation, The Israel Cancer Association, The Israel Ministry of Health, the Emerson Foundation and the European Union. Recently, his laboratory received recognition as a Center of Excellence by the World Allergy Organization.

Eli Pikarsky

The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Angel Porgador

Ben Gurion University

Miki Rahat

Director, Research Laboratories and Immunotherapy Lab, Carmel Medical Center

I study the multifunctional protein EMMPRIN/CD147 in the context of malignancy and autoimmune diseases. As a mediator of epithelial cells-macrophage interactions, it is involved in angiogenesis, EMT and metastasis. Two approaches targeting a specific epitope in the protein were developed, one using an active peptide and the other using an antibody. The two approaches inhibited tumor progression and metastasis. I now study the efficacy and mechanisms of action of these vaccinations, focusing on their ability to prevent the metastatic outbreak. Additionally, I investigate the pro-angiogenic role of EMMPRIN in autoimmune diseases (e.g., RA, PsA, and T2DM). 

Yoram Reiter

Technion - Israel Institute of Technology

Professor Yoram Reiter, Laboratory of Molecular Immunology, Sebba chair in Sciences. Director of the Lokey interdisciplinary Center for Life Sciences and Engineering.

Reiter is a Professor and the head of the Laboratory of Molecular Immunology and Cancer Immunotherapy at the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology. His research involves basic and translational research in antibody and cell engineering for the design of novel immunotherapies. Reiter is a graduate of the Weizmann Institute of Science and post doc fellow at the NCI, NIH. He is at the Technion faculty since 1998. He has more than 25 years of experience in molecular immunology, antibody and cell engineering related to cancer immunotherapy. He is pioneer in the field of TCR mimicking antibodies. This work lead to the creation of Applied Immune Technologies developing next generation antibody-based immunotherapies. AIT was acquired and merged into Adicet Bio Inc (NASDAQ:ACET) which recently presented highly promising clinical data in NHL with CAR-engineered gamma-delta1 T cells. Reiter's lab combines basic and translational research related to T cell biology, effector T cells functions, design of optimal CARs and well as multiple project on antibody engineering and T cell engagers. Reiter was the dean of the faculty of Biology (twice) and is director of an institutional interdisciplinary research. He published >120 papers, patents, review articles in the fields of molecular immunology and antibody engineering.

Asya Rolls

Technion - Israel Institute of Technology

Noga Ron Harel

Technion - Israel Institute of Technology

Benyamin Rosental

Ben Gurion University

PROFESSIONAL PREPARATION:
Ben-Gurion University, Israel, Life Sciences.       
B.Sc., 2007
Ben-Gurion University, Israel, Microbiology and Immunology.               M.Med.Sc., 2010
Ben-Gurion University, Israel, Immunology.                  
Ph.D., 2013
Stanford University, CA, USA, Stem Cells and Comparative Immunology.  Postdoc., 2018
 
Head of Comparative Immunology and Stem Cells Transplantation Laboratory
Our laboratory research is focusing on tissue acceptance by the immune system, and stem cell transplantation. Our research is unique since we are working with non-classical model organisms to answer basic questions in immunology, for translating our findings to medical research.

Yardena Samuels

Weizmann Institute of Science

Ronit Satchi-Fainaro

Tel Aviv University

Prof. Ronit Satchi-Fainaro (Ph.D.) is a Full Professor at Tel Aviv University, where she is head of the Cancer Research & Nanomedicine Laboratory, Director of Tel Aviv University Cancer Biology Research Center, Director of the TAU Kahn 3D BioPrinting Initiative, and holds the Lion Chair in Nanosciences and Nanotechnologies. She serves on the BoD of Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd. and the BoG of TAU, and is a member of the SAB of several Innovation Centers, Universities, Hospitals, Fellowships Committees, VCs, and editorial boards of scientific journals.

Her multidisciplinary research laboratory focuses on basic research elucidating the mechanisms underlying the switch from cancer dormancy leading to the discovery of new molecular targets to interrupt tumor-host interactions. She has published more than 130 manuscripts, 13 book chapters, edited two books, is named inventor on 60 patents, some of which were licensed to Pharmaceutical and Biotech companies. She founded two spin-off companies and is actively engaged in translational research with several industry partners and in science outreach.

Idit Shachar

The Weizmann Institute of Science

Tal Shay

Ben Gurion University

Shai Shen-Orr

Technion - Israel Institute of Technology

Eilon Sherman

The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Adi Stern

Tel Aviv University

Noam Stern-Ginossar

Weizmann Institute of Science

Ziv Shulman

The Weizmann Institute of Science

Ran Taube

Ben Gurion University

Education
Tel Aviv University, TLV, Israel B.Sc. 1986 Life Sciences
Tel Aviv University, TLV, Israel M.Sc. 1992 Microbiology
Tel Aviv University, TLV, Israel Ph.D. 1998 Virology
University of California at San Francisco Post Doc. 1999-2002 Virology
Harvard Medical School –Dana Farber Cancer Institute Post Doc. 2004-2007 Virology 
 
Employment
2008-2015  -   Lecturer  -  Ben Gurion University of the Negev
2015-2020  -  Assistance professor - Ben Gurion University of the Negev
2020 - Associate Professor
 
We are currently focusing to identify novel factors that modulate HIV gene expression and promote viral latency. We are directing our efforts on the role of non-coding RNAs, in particular long ncRNA, and their role in establishing HIV latency. We apply our knowledge on newly identified lncRNAs and their role in promoting human malignancies. As part of our work we are conducting extensive work in different cell lines, as well as primary cells of various origins that support HIV replication. We also have experience in performing in vitro analysis of HIV replication, including purification of reverse transcriptase form bacteria and analysis of RT activity.

Boaz Tirosh

The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Prof. Boaz Tirosh is a full professor of the Hebrew University and currently serves as the head of the School of Pharmacy of the Hebrew University.

His lab is interested in stress signaling as a regulator of cell function and response to drug therapy. A major interest of the lab is the unfolded protein response and the mTOR pathway.

Prof. Tirosh published more than 70 peer-reviewed scientific papers and is the inventor of several technologies in the field of antibody production.

Chen Varol

Tel Aviv University

Chen Varol (PhD) is the director of the Research Center for Digestive Tract & Liver Diseases, at Tel-Aviv Sourasky Medical Center. He is also a Senior lecturer at the Department of Clinical Microbiology & Immunology, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv Israel.

Dr. Varol is an Immunologist, who strives to decipher the involvement of phagocytic innate immune cells in diseases of the digestive tract and metabolic syndrome. Our studies had major contribution to the current comprehension of gut and liver macrophage ontogeny and functional heterogeneity. We are in uncovering immunoregulatory pathways that mediate the pathological versus restorative activity of these cells.

Elena Voronov

Ben-Gurion University of the Negev

Elena Voronov received her MD degree in 1980 from the Samara Medical School, Samara, Russia.  In 1988, Dr. Voronov was awarded her PhD by The State Institute for Continuing Education for Physicians, Leningrad, Russia. The title of her thesis was: "Immunology of viral hepatitis: Prognostic role of immune-complexes and functional activity of leukocytes".  Dr. Voronov worked as a physician and an Assistant Professor in the Medical Institute in Samara. In 1990, Dr. Voronov and her family immigrated to Israel and began working in Professor Apte’s lab in the Immunology Department of Ben Gurion University of the Negev School of Medicine, in Beer Sheva, Israel. During these years, Dr. Voronov has been investigating the role of Interleukin-1 family molecules and their role in inflammation and cancer.

Gur Yaari

Bar Ilan University

Debbie Yablonski

Technion - Israel Institute of Technology